Originally posted on Football Nation  |  Last updated 3/17/12
WIDE RECEIVERS
1.       Justin Blackmon – JR (RS) – Oklahoma State (6-1, 207)  Hometown: Ardmore, Okla. (Plainview)
 
STRENGTHS: Blackmon has the outstanding frame and physical tools that you look for in a top receiver at the next level. He has strong hands that allow him to secure tough grabs. Blackmon is also an aggressive pass catcher who will go up and fight for the ball, often winning that battle. He has awesome upper-body strength and does a great job of beating the jam at the line of scrimmage. This trait also makes Blackmon an effective downfield-blocker. He is solid after the catch with superb run strength and nice agility, making him a tough tackle. Blackmon turned in a tantalizing 40-yard dash time at Oklahoma State’s Pro Day, reportedly timing somewhere in the 4.4s. 
 
WEAKNESSES: Blackmon’s Pro Day time does not align with his speed on the field. He has enough speed for the NFL but won’t be a burner, possessing just an average top gear. Though he has enviably strong hands, Blackmon will have concentration lapses and drop catchable balls. He doesn’t always tuck the ball away properly after the catch, exposing the ball to defenders too much. He will need to expand his route running repertoire in the NFL, having been asked to run a simplified route tree in college. Blackmon will also have to answer maturity questions. He was arrested in 2010 on DUI charge and was subsequently suspended for a game.
 
STATS:
2011: 121 catches, 1,522 receiving yards (12.6 avg.), 18 TDs
2010: 111 catches, 1,782 receiving yards (16.1 avg.), 20 TDs; rushing TD; PR TD
2009: 20 catches, 260 receiving yards (13.0 avg.) 2 TDs
 
COMBINE:
40 yard: DNP Bench: 14 reps Vertical: DNP Broad: DNP Cone Drill: DNP 20 Shuttle: DNP
60 Shuttle: DNP
 
2.       Michael Floyd – SR – Notre Dame (6-3, 220)  Hometown: St. Paul, Minn. (Cretin-Derham Hall)
 
STRENGTHS: Floyd has great size and outstanding physical toughness. He competes hard an aggressively fights to make the catch. Floyd isn’t afraid to go over the middle and doesn’t shy away from contact. He is a powerful and physical runner after the catch, running through arm tackles with ease. He knows how to use his size advantage and shield off defenders from making a play on the ball. Floyd has exceptional hand-eye coordination and tracks the ball very well, even on ones thrown over his shoulder. He has solid hops and strong hands to go up in a crowd and come down with the ball.
 
WEAKNESSES: He timed nicely at the Combine, but is not overly explosive and won’t outrun NFL defensive backs. He isn’t very elusive after the catch either, relying more on straight-line speed and run power to gain yards. His physicality has left him dinged up in the past, missing most of the 2009 season with a broken collarbone and the last two games of the 2008 season with a knee injury. What Floyd’s draft status may hinge on the most, however, is whether or not he can prove that he has matured. He has three arrests on his record related to alcohol and will need to show he has moved on from these incidents.
 
STATS:
2011: 100 catches, 1,147 receiving yards (11.5 avg.), 9 TDs; rushing TD
2010: 79 catches, 1,025 receiving yards (13.0 avg.), 12 TDs
2009: 44 catches, 795 receiving yards (18.1 avg.), 9 TDs
2008: 48 catches, 719 receiving yards (15.0 avg.), 7 TDs
 
COMBINE:
40 yard: 4.47 Bench: 16 reps Vertical: 36.5” Broad: 10’2” Cone Drill: DNP 20 Shuttle: DNP 60 Shuttle: DNP
 
3.       Kendall Wright – SR – Baylor (5-10, 196)  Hometown: Pittsburg, Texas
 
STRENGTHS: While Wright timed poorly at the Combine, it was due more to poor technique (moving his hand too early) than a lack of speed. Make no mistake, Wright possesses elite speed and has the ability to be a solid vertical threat in the NFL. He is very explosive and has outstanding acceleration. This allows Wright to excel in the open field, utilizing excellent shiftiness and agility to shake defenders. He has a great combination of soft hands, concentration and body control that makes him a natural pass catcher. Wright is a great leaper and will make acrobatic catches with ease. He also shows toughness as a runner, breaking tackles, and is a willing blocker downfield.
 
WEAKNESSES: Wright’s lack of height may limit where he is lined up at the next level. He will struggle getting out of the jam against the much more physical defensive backs of the NFL. Wright didn’t run a full route tree in Baylor’s wide-open offense and will need polishing in his route running. This will also require learning more complex routes that NFL teams use. Tough he is a willing blocker, Wright doesn’t have the functional strength to be effective in this area in the NFL.
 
STATS:
2011: 108 catches, 1,663 receiving yards (15.4 avg.), 14 TDs; passing TD
2010: 78 catches, 952 receiving yards (12.2 avg.), 7 TDs; passing TD
2009: 68 catches, 740 receiving yards (11.2 avg.), 4 TDs; 132 rushing yards, TD
2008: 50 catches, 649 receiving yards (13.0 avg.), 5 TDs; 168 rushing yards, TD
 
COMBINE:
40 yard: 4.61 Bench: DNP Vertical: 38.5” Broad: 10’1” Cone Drill: 6.93 20 Shuttle: 4.18
60 Shuttle: DNP
 
 
4.       Rueben Randle – JR – LSU (6-3, 210)  Hometown: Bastrop, La.
 
STRENGTHS: Randle has great height and a nice frame that projects well to the NFL. He is a smooth runner with fluid acceleration and takes nice, long strides once he hits top gear. He has a solid set of hands and does a nice job securing the ball even when contested. Randle is a strong and tough pass catcher who isn’t afraid of contact. His toughness also shows as a runner after the catch, fighting through tackles and earning extra yardage. Randle tracks the football well and has great body control to compensate nicely on difficult or poorly thrown balls. He is also a willing and physical blocker.
 
WEAKNESSES: Randle has a lot of talent, but is still a raw and developing prospect. He needs to fine-tune his route running, lacking polish and understanding of certain routes. He is generally a reliable pass catcher, but he too often allows the ball into his chest. Though a physical and tough receiver, Randle will need to add some bulk for the NFL where the punishment is dialed up. He has deceptive speed, but lacks an elite top gear and will struggle to breakaway at the next level. Randle isn’t very elusive in the open field either and won’t juke out many defenders.
 
STATS:
2011: 53 catches, 917 receiving yards (17.3 avg.), 8 TDs
2010: 33 catches, 544 receiving yards (16.5 avg.), 3 TDs
2009: 11 catches, 173 receiving yards (15.7 avg.), 2 TDs
 
COMBINE:
40 yard: 4.55 Bench: 15 reps Vertical: 31” Broad: 10’1” Cone Drill: 6.99 20 Shuttle: 4.36
60 Shuttle: 11.78
 
5.       Mohamed Sanu – JR – Rutgers (6-2, 211)  Hometown: South Brunswick, N.J.
 
STRENGTHS: Sanu has the best set of hands in this year’s draft class. He catches the ball away from his body and rarely lets it into his chest. He has elite hand-eye coordination and exceptional body control that allows him to catch almost any ball thrown in his direction. Sanu is also tough enough to venture across the middle and won’t cower around oncoming defenders. He has solid vision as a runner and, though not overly elusive, knows how to navigate through defenses. Sanu has the strength to shrug off tacklers who don’t wrap up. He showcased versatility at Rutgers as well, operating in the “Wildcat” and has been used as a punt returner.
 
WEAKNESSES: Sanu did not help himself at the Combine, turning in a poor 4.67 40-yard dash. Lack of elite speed and explosiveness will most likely drive him down draft boards. He plays faster than his timed speed, but not much. Sanu will have a tough time separating at the next level. He earned extra yards in college through solid field vision and strength, but won’t be able to manipulate and overpower defenders as easily in the NFL. His poor elusiveness will hurt him in this area as well. Sanu possesses outstanding skills in certain areas, but his greatly limited abilities in other areas may scare off some teams.
 
STATS:
2011: 115 catches, 1,206 receiving yards (10.5 avg.), 7 TDs
2010: 44 catches, 418 receiving yards (9.5 avg.), 2 TDs; 309 rushing yards, 4 TDs; 3 passing TDs
2009: 51 catches, 639 receiving yards (12.5 avg.), 3 TDs; 346 rushing yards,  5 TDs; passing TD
 
COMBINE:
40 yard: 4.67 Bench: 19 reps Vertical: 36” Broad: 10’6” Cone Drill: 6.88 20 Shuttle: 4.22
60 Shuttle: DNP
  The Best of the Rest
  6.       Alshon Jeffery – JR – South Carolina (6-3, 216)  Hometown: St. Matthews, S.C. (Calhoun County)
COMBINE: Did not participate in any drills
 
7.       Stephen Hill – JR – Georgia Tech (6-4, 215)  Hometown: Lithonia, Ga. (Miller Grove)
COMBINE: 40 yard: 4.36 Bench: 14 reps Vertical: 39.5” Broad: 11’1” Cone Drill: 6.88
20 Shuttle: 4.48 60 Shuttle: 11.43
 
8.       Nick Toon – SR – Wisconsin (6-2, 215)  Hometown: Middleton, Wis.
COMBINE: 40 yard: 4.54 Bench: 18 reps Vertical: 37.5” Broad: DNP Cone Drill: DNP 20 Shuttle: DNP
60 Shuttle: DNP
 
9.       Brian Quick – SR – Appalachian State *Sleeper*
 
10.   Chris Givens – JR (RS) – Wake Forest  (5-11, 198)  Hometown: Wylie, Texas
COMBINE: 40 yard: 4.41 Bench: 19 reps Vertical: 33.5” Broad: 9’10” Cone Drill: 6.97
 20 Shuttle: 4.23 60 Shuttle: DNP
  Non-BCS Sleeper Profile  
Brian Quick – SR – Appalachian State (6-4, 220)  Hometown: Columbia, S.C. (Ridge View)
 
STRENGTHS: Quick has elite size and arm length for a receiver, which should translate nicely to the NFL. A talented basketball player in high school, Quick is very athletic for his size and possesses great body control. His basketball roots also show up in his leaping ability and hand-eye coordination. Quick can snatch high passes out of the air with ease and contort his body to catch poorly-thrown balls outside his frame. He has deceptive speed and agility for a guy his size, allowing him to create after the catch. While he still needs to improve his technique, Quick has shown willingness as a blocker downfield and has the size to be effective at the next level.
 
WEAKNESSES: Quick’s biggest drawback is his lack of polish. Only playing one season of high school football before enrolling at Appalachian State, Quick entered the college ranks extremely raw and didn’t receive the coaching needed to reach his full potential. He admitted that he was hardly given positional coaching in college and never had a receivers coach until working with the Minnesota Viking’s coaching staff at the Senior Bowl. His potential as an NFL player will hang on how well he can progress in this area and digest an NFL playbook. Quick has also struggled at times with concentration lapses and drops catchable passes, looking upfield before securing the catch. He has outstanding upside, but has a lot of work ahead of him before he can start in the NFL.
 
STATS:
2011: 71 catches, 1,096 receiving yards (15.4 avg.), 11 TDs
2010: 47 catches, 844 receiving yards (18.0 avg.), 9 TDs
2009: 61 catches, 982 receiving yards (16.1 avg.), 4 TDs
2008: 23 catches, 496 receiving yards (21.6 avg.), 7 TDs
 
COMBINE:
40 yard: 4.55 Bench: 15 reps Vertical: 34” Broad: 9’11” Cone Drill: 7.10 20 Shuttle: 4.23
60 Shuttle: DNP
 

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