Found January 09, 2013 on Fox Sports:
Judgment day has arrived for Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa to find out their Hall of Fame fates. With the cloud of steroids shrouding many candidacies, baseball writers may fail for the only the second time in more than four decades to elect anyone to the Hall. About 600 people are eligible to vote in the BBWAA election, all members of the organization for 10 consecutive years at any point. Results were to be announced at 2 p.m. EST Wednesday, with the focus on first-time eligibles that include Bonds, baseball's only seven-time Most Valuable Player, and Clemens, the only seven-time Cy Young Award winner. Since 1965, the only years the writers didn't elect a candidate were when Yogi Berra topped the 1971 vote by appearing on 67 percent of the ballots cast and when Phil Niekro headed the 1996 ballot at 68 percent. Both were chosen the following years when they achieved the 75 percent necessary for election. ''It really would be a shame, especially since the other people going in this year are not among the living, which will make for a rather strange ceremony,'' said the San Francisco Chronicle's Susan Slusser, president of the Baseball Writers' Association of America. Three inductees were chosen last month by the 16-member panel considering individuals from the era before integration in 1946: Yankees owner Jacob Ruppert, umpire Hank O'Day and barehanded catcher Deacon White. They will be enshrined during a ceremony at Cooperstown on July 28. Also on the ballot for the first time are Sosa and Mike Piazza, power hitters whose statistics have been questioned because of the Steroids Era, and Craig Biggio, 20th on the career list with 3,060 hits - all for the Houston Astros. Curt Schilling, 11-2 with a 2.23 ERA in postseason play, is another ballot rookie. The Hall was prepared to hold a news conference Thursday with any electees. Or to not have one. Biggio wasn't sure whether the controversy over this year's ballot would keep all candidates out. ''All I know is that for this organization I did everything they ever asked me to do and I'm proud about it, so hopefully, the writers feel strongly, they liked what they saw, and we'll see what happens,'' Biggio said on Nov. 28, the day the ballot was announced. Jane Forbes Clark, the Hall's chairman, said last year she was not troubled by voters weighing how to evaluate players in the era of performance-enhancing drugs. ''I think the museum is very comfortable with the decisions that the baseball writers make,'' she said. ''And so it's not a bad debate by any means.'' Bonds has denied knowingly using performance-enhancing drugs and was convicted of one count of obstruction of justice for giving an evasive answer in 2003 to a grand jury investigating PEDs. Clemens was acquitted of perjury charges stemming from congressional testimony during which he denied using PEDs. Sosa, who finished with 609 home runs, was among those who tested positive in MLB's 2003 anonymous survey, The New York Times reported in 2009. He told a congressional committee in 2005 that he never took illegal performance-enhancing drugs. The BBWAA election rules say ''voting shall be based upon the player's record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character, and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played.'' ''Steroid or HGH use is cheating, plain and simple,'' ESPN.com's Wallace Matthews wrote. ''And by definition, cheaters lack integrity, sportsmanship and character. Strike one, strike two, strike three.'' Several holdovers from last year remain on the 37-player ballot, with top candidates including Jack Morris (67 percent), Jeff Bagwell (56 percent), Lee Smith (51 percent) and Tim Raines (49 percent). When The Associated Press surveyed 112 eligible voters in late November, Bonds received 45 percent support among voters who expressed an opinion, Clemens 43 percent and Sosa 18 percent. The Baseball Think Factory website compiled votes by writers who made their opinions public and with 159 ballots had everyone falling short. Biggio was at 69 percent, followed by Morris (63), Bagwell (61), Raines (61), Piazza (60), Bonds (43) and Clemens (43). Morris finished second last year when Barry Larkin was elected and is in his 14th and next-to-last year of eligibility. He could become the player with the highest-percentage of the vote who is not in the Hall, a mark currently held by Gil Hodges at 63 percent in 1983. Several players who fell just short in the BBWAA balloting later were elected by either the Veterans Committee or Old-Timers' Committee: Nellie Fox (74.7 percent on the 1985 BBWAA ballot), Jim Bunning (74.2 percent in 1988), Orlando Cepeda (73.6 percent in 1994) and Frank Chance (72.5 percent in 1945). Ace of three World Series winners, Morris finished with 254 victories and was the winningest pitcher of the 1980s. His 3.90 ERA, however, is higher than that of any Hall of Famer. Morris will be joined on next year's ballot by Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine, both 300-game winners. If no one is elected this year, there could be a logjam in 2014. Voters may select up to 10 players. The only certainty is the Hall is pleased with the writers' process. ''While the BBWAA does the actual voting, it only does so at the request of the Hall of Fame,'' said the Los Angeles Times' Bill Shaikin, the organization's past president. ''If the Hall of Fame is troubled, certainly the Hall could make alternate arrangements.''
THE BACKYARD
BEST OF MAXIM
RELATED ARTICLES

Thumbs Up From Barry Bonds In Hawaii

As expected, Barry Bonds didn’t get into the Baseball Hall of Fame today, only getting 36.2% of the 75% needed to gain entry into the Hall. Meanwhile, Barry left the mainland for vacation in Hawaii, the perfect place to visit when cameras are trying to hunt you down in California. As you can see in the above photo from @KateHiggy_4, Bonds isn’t exactly shedding tears. Thumbs...

Why Barry Bonds Didn’t Make The Hall Of Fame: Before And After Steroids Pics

Today began Barry Bonds trip down a long and winding road that may never end at the Baseball Hall of Fame. In his first year… [[ Read More ]]

Giants president Larry Baer accepts decision to deny Barry Bonds induction to Hall

Following Wednesday’s announcement that Barry Bonds (and everybody else) was not elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, Giants president Larry Baer was accepting yet disappointed about the decision. Here’s what he told the Chronicle’s Henry Schulman: “This was the decision. It’s difficult. There have been complications in determining Hall of Famers throughout history, and...

Cooperstown Choices: Barry Bonds

With the Hall Of Fame election announcement coming on January 9, 2013, it is time to review the ballot, go over the names, and decide who belongs in the Hall Of Fame. There are twenty four men on the ballot for the first time this year and we will take a look at each one individually prior to official announcements. You can find all of the profiles in the I-70 Baseball Exclusives...

Barry Bonds not elected to Baseball Hall of Fame

Judgment day has finally come for Barry Bonds. And, as many expected, the embattled all-time leader in home runs will not be a first-ballot hall of famer. In his first year of eligibility on the ballot, the former Giants slugger fell well short of the 75 percent threshhold required for induction, receiving just 36.2 percent of the vote. In fact, nobody will be part of baseball...

Mark McGwire’s Hall of Fame votes should frame Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds debate

The result of this year’s Hall of Fame election, in which no payers were elected, is already controversial enough, but the number of votes for some players who appeared on the ballot for the first time is what could set the stage for vehement arguments for years to come. Known steroid users Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds graced the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time this year...

No player elected to Hall of Fame

Steroid-tainted stars Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa have been denied entry to the Baseball Hall of Fame with voters failing to elect any candidates for only the second time in four decades. A candidate must receive 75 percent of the vote from the voting members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America in order to be inducted. In totals announced Wednesday...

Baseball Hall of Fame Pitches Shutout

For the first time since 1996, Cooperstown will not see any new faces inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. The most notable players who did not get the 75 percent vote required to be inducted were Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens. This isn’t going to be a surprise to most as they were both [...] [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

Column: Bonds, Clemens will get in. Bet on it.

(Eds: With AP Photos.) By JIM LITKE AP Sports Columnist Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens will get into the Hall of Fame someday, and without using the side entrance, either. It won't be because people forget, or even forgive, but because they won't care anymore. Everybody in every sport will be on some kind of performance-enhancer by then, the way they're all on '&...

Column: No suspense for Bonds, Clemens in HOF vote

(Eds: With AP Photos.) By TIM DAHLBERG AP Sports Columnist Barry Bonds can go for a bike ride. Roger Clemens might want to head to the gym for one of those famous workouts that used to make him pitch like he was 22 when he was 42. If the polls are right - and my guess is they're pretty spot on - there's no need for either to wait by the phone Wednesday when baseball writers...

BBWAA? Who Needs The Hall Of FAME!

The most anticipated day in the Baseball Writers’ Association of America (BBWAA) has finally come and gone and yes of course they have spoken loudly with their pens selecting who they think is worthy of getting into their precious Baseball Hall of Fame.  This year baseball has taken a closer interest in who is voted in because of the elite and polarizing names displayed on...

Colin Wyers on the Hall of Fame electing no one

Colin Wyers wrote an excellent article for Baseball Prospectus in response to the BBWAA not electing a single player on a ballot that had more than 10 qualified Hall of Famers. the Hall is dedicated to preserving history, honoring excellence and connecting generations of baseball fans. The debate over the latest slate of players focuses on the second point, and focuses on the idea...

Cooperstown will remain dark this year

For the first time since 1996, the BBWAA (Baseball Writers Association of America) elected no one to the Baseball Hall of Fame. The ballot consisted of many repeat players such as Jack Morris making his 14th appearance but was littered with players linked to steroids such as Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens. The *home run king* received 36.2% of the votes which was well short of the...

New York Times runs blank front sports page after Hall of Fame voting (Picture)

The fact that no players were elected to the baseball Hall of Fame on Wednesday has everyone buzzing, and the New York Times came up with the perfect way to encapsulate the hype. On the front page of the “Sports” section on Thursday morning, nothing was printed except a headline that read “Welcome to Cooperstown.” Most people felt as though Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds had...
Astros News
Delivered to your inbox
You'll also receive Yardbarker's daily Top 10, featuring the best sports stories from around the web. Customize your newsletter to get articles on your favorite sports and teams. And the best part? It's free!

Today's Best Stuff
For Bloggers

Join the Yardbarker Network for more promotion, traffic, and money.

Company Info
Help
What is Yardbarker?

Yardbarker is the largest network of sports blogs and pro athlete blogs on the web. This site is the hub of the Yardbarker Network, where our editors and algorithms curate the best sports content from our network and beyond.