Found December 01, 2012 on The Biz of Baseball:

Via The Biz Of Baseball:

An annual report released as part of Major League Baseball’s drug program shows that of 5,136 tests for performance-enhancing drugs and stimulants, a total of 18 tested positive, or less than 1 percent (0.35%) during the 2012 season. While 18 players tested positive for banned substances, not all served suspensions as a first offense for stimulants only results in follow-up testing. Only at the time of second violation does game suspension occur with that resulting in 25 games. Two players served suspensions for stimulants as part of this past season’s testing. Baltimore Orioles shortstop Ryan Adams, who at the time was on the roster of the Triple-A Norfolk Tides was suspended on Nov. 2, and just this past Tuesday, Philadelphia Phillies catcher Carlos Ruiz joined him. Both players will see their suspensions served beginning next season.

There were a total of 7 positive tests for performance-enhancing substances that resulted in discipline, with four accounting for testosterone that resulted in 50 game suspension. Three were announced suspensions during the course of the year (San Diego Padres catcher Yasmani Grandal; Oakland Athletics pitcher Bartolo Colon, and; San Francisco Giants outfielder Melky Cabrera), but the fourth was not announced. That now appears to be Manny Ramirez who retired in early 2011 to avoid a 100-game suspension for a second violation of the drug policy. After sitting out the entire 2011 season, a deal was reached with MLB and the MLBPA to allow his reinstatement and to serve just 50 games rather than 100 after signing with the Athletics.

In terms of  the other three PED violations that resulted in discipline, they were one for Clostebol (Philadelphia Phillies infielder Freddy Galvis, 50 games), one for Tamoxifen (free agent outfielder Marlon Byrd, 50 games), and one for Clenbuterol (San Francisco Giants pitcher Guillermo Mota who received a 100 game suspension for a second PED violation. His first was Nov 1 of 2006 while with the Mets).

As part of the new labor agreement— and a historic first, the league—the sides agreed to and conducted blood testing for human-growth hormone (hGH) this past season. The tests were all conducted during Spring Training, and for 2012, there was no in-season blood draws for testing. Of the 5,136 tests, there were 1,181 blood tests for hGH. The league and union are nearing changes to the policy that could be announced shortly, and with it, it is possible that testing during the regular season could occur as the current labor agreement states that the sides will look into the “possibility of implementing in-season testing.” This will also be the first full offseason in which random offseason testing will occur. The drug policy does not state how many tests for hGH can occur during that time. The drug policy states that the blood draws “will be tested for the presence of hGH only."

 

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