Originally posted on FOX Sports  |  Last updated 10/2/12
Only hours before getting his second chance in the big leagues, Adam Greenberg admitted he was nervous. Not about facing one of baseball's best pitchers - but about some pregame antics his new Miami Marlins teammates had in store for him. Greenberg signed a one-day contract to play Tuesday night as a pinch-hitter in the Marlins' game against the New York Mets, who planned to start 20-game winner R.A. Dickey. The game was Greenberg's first since he stepped to the plate for his major league debut in 2005 and was hit in the back of the head by the first pitch he saw - a 92-mph fastball that derailed his career. Greenberg, 31, took part in batting practice and said he was overwhelmed by the positive reception from his new teammates, who planned to treat him like any other rookie. Catcher John Buck said Greenberg would don a USA Speedo, blue tennis shoes and pink goggles for a pregame performance in the clubhouse. ''I've got to go sing and dance in front of them like a real rookie,'' Greenberg said. ''That, to be honest, is what I'm more nervous about.'' The 5-foot-9 Greenberg said he hoped the game marks only the beginning of a career comeback. He didn't play in the minor leagues this year and hasn't been with a major league organization since 2008, but he still harbors hopes of a big-league job. ''Hopefully there is going to be a lot more of this. This is good stuff,'' Greenberg said at a pregame news conference. ''I want to show everyone I can play, although you can never really truly do that in one at-bat, especially if it ends up being against Dickey.'' Several Marlins played with Greenberg in the minors as he struggled to recover from his beaning. ''He was a good player, and for it to be ruined on one pitch is a tough blow, if you will,'' Buck said. ''But he has fought back. This is one of those good stories for young kids and what baseball is about - enduring to the end, and making the most of your opportunity.'' The Greenberg signing was a rare feel-good story for the last-place Marlins, who have endured the most disappointing season in the franchise's 20-year history. They gave Greenberg jersey No. 10, a more prestigious number than the No. 66 he recalled wearing in Chicago Cubs spring training. The outfielder made his big league debut with the Cubs in Miami on July 9, 2005, and was hit by a pitch thrown by Marlins left-hander Valerio De Los Santos. He suffered a concussion that caused vision problems, vertigo and headaches lasting hours at a time, and it was nearly two years before he regained full health. ''I was concerned more with the quality of my life than playing ball,'' he said. ''It was a tough time.'' He married, started a health-supplement business and played in the independent Atlantic League. A recent online campaign known as ''One At Bat'' lobbied for Greenberg to get a second chance in the majors, and the Marlins last week offered him an opportunity to play in the next-to-last game of their season. For seven years, Greenberg was one of only two players to be hit by a pitch in his lone big-league appearance and never take the field. The other was Fred van Dusen with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1955. Van Dusen flew down from his home in Franklin, Tenn., to attend Tuesday's game and joined the rest of the crowd applauding Greenberg's comeback. ''Life throws you curveballs,'' Greenberg said. ''Mine threw me a fastball at 92, and it hit me in the back of the head. I got up from it, and my life is great.''
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