Originally posted on Fangraphs  |  Last updated 5/17/12

“In the end,” Thompson wrote, “very few people will remember anything I have done as a baseball player. But hopefully they will remember what kind of person and teammate I am.”

– the Philadelphia Enquirer

For those who missed the Rays and Red Sox game last night, here’s the update: In the bottom of the eighth, moments before a blood-souring hit-by-pitch to Will Rhymes, pinch runner Rich Thompson took over for Luke Scott at second base. Much of the audience was probably — and perhaps rightly — focused on Rhymes.

But at the same time, Thompson standing at second was a spectacle in itself.

Rich Thompson entered #Rays game last night as pinch-runner in 8th inn.: 8 yrs, 24 days and 915 MiLB games since his last big league game.

— Jonathan Gantt (@Jonathan_Gantt) May 17, 2012

The outfielder and 33-year-old Rich was tied for the fifth or six oldest minor league player entering this season, depending on whether you count the Mexican League and the NPB. In the International League, only DeWayne Wise, Bobby Scales, and Corky Miller rank as his seniors. And unlike those guys, Thompson has only one MLB plate appearance.

In his one MLB plate appearance, in his one MLB pitch, Thompson hit a ground ball for an inning-ending double play off Time Laker — 34-year-old catcher Tim Laker, pitching only because the game was already out of hand.

That was in 2004, when Thompson was a 25-year-old outfielder and coming off three-straight 40+ steals season in the minors. He was a Rule 5 draft pick, traded to the Royals, that year, and he appeared in a total of 6 games, getting 1 steal and 1 PA. By the end of April, he was returned to the Pirates and back in the minor leagues for his fourth-straight season with 40+ steals. He stayed there for eight years.

Until yesterday.

On Wednesday afternoon, May 5, 2012, the Tampa Bay Rays — riddled with injuries, yet top in the AL with 23 wins — traded for Thompson and immediately put him on the 25-man roster.

I cannot imagine how that day must have been. Or, rather, I cannot imagine how that day felt; I can imagine how it went. Perhaps Thompson arrives to the ballpark like usual (the IronPigs were at home on Wednesday); he starts lacing up and getting ready. A phone rings in the office. Then Ryne Sandberg steps out and calls Thompson over, shuts the door. For a few moments, the 33-year-old outfielder had to think he was getting released. For a Triple-A roster that has featured Scott Podsednik, Domonic Brown, Mike Fontenot, Dave Bush, and Pat Misch, Thompson is a minor leaguer among veterans and prospects.

But Sandberg does not hand Thompson his papers. He hands him a plane ticket.

Not only is Thompson getting trading, but he is joining the 25-man roster. Instead of starting against the Indianapolis Indians that night, he was in the dugout at Tropicana Field.

Thompson is in many ways the Raysian prototype. The team’s foundation of success — homegrown stud pitchers and strong-fielding franchise players (namely: Evan Longoria and Ben Zobrist) — does not work without the Great Insulation: Inexpensive specialists that fill the remainder of the roster.

Framing specialist Jose Molina. Fielding expert Sam Fuld. The Fernando Rodney Renaissance and the Matchup Patchwork Bullpen. Broken veterans or peculiar rookies go to the Trop for a second (or first) chance — and many have blossomed.

Kyle Farnsworth and Rafael Soriano changed the perception about them after each dominated in the closer’s role. Eric Hinske and Johnny Damon showed they still had a use in this league, and a use as regular contributors. One word: Casey Kotchman.

Tonight, Thompson gets his first career start in left field, gets a chance. And though the Rays deserve applause if Thompson turns out to be the Sam Fuld duplicate they want, the real lauding goes to Thompson himself.

This game means nothing without the people. Spectator sports are the games of watching others’ lives, in participating by proxy in the joys and terrors of the game.

Thompson has thrown himself at this sport. He has hurled his life into this game with an almost reckless passion. He recently got his CPA certification and probably has a chance at becoming a baseball instructor of some capacity, but for the most part, he is a man who is entering what would be his peak earning years with a resume that says “athlete” and “82.8% SB success rate” (that’s not a typo).

He has sent his life, his family, in this direction, in this pursuit for a singular goal. I long for that kind of dedication, that kind of ever-burning hope in my heart. I wish I could put that kind of fervor into my job and my marriage and even my leisure. I wish I could edge along the cliff of oblivion with courage and dry palms like this unknown and soon-forgotten outfielder.

Thompson had come to peace with his, so to speak, disappointing MLB career. In the Philadelphia Enquirer piece quoted earlier, he mentions how he would like to make it back to the big leagues, how he would use the money for a car if he got called up to the big leagues in September. In the span of less than a week since he wrote that, he has joined a top MLB franchise with the best record in the AL and a strong chance for postseason play. Tonight, he’s starting against the team’s hated division rival, the Boston Red Sox. His story went from fringe to likely Disney movie.

This is a game — a business — that consumes. For the fans, we are not always privy to the dull ache of the retiring minor leaguer, the quiet glory of a Dirk Hayhurst career. Many, many careers end with an injury in Low-A, ineffectiveness in Double-A, or some other unseen change that results in a final stat line and an ended career. Every player, whether minor leaguer or major, has to experience the death of a dream. Very few retire on top or retire because they have “finished.”

Odds are, because I have written this piece and because you have read at least this far, you and I will not forget Rich Thompson, the 33-year-old rookie outfielder. I will not forget him as a player, and to know him as a player is to know him as a fighter, an endurer, a feel-good story in a feel-bad world.

And he is worth remembering. Both as a person and a player.

Is Madison Bumgarner a bully?
Ios_download En_app_rgb_wo_45

Jamaal Charles (knee) to miss Sunday’s game against Colts

Report: C.J. Anderson will be in recovery for ‘months’

Indians' Roberto Perez reveals battle with Bell's palsy

76ers apologize for pulling singer from national anthem

Cubs fans line up outside bar at 5:30 am before Game 3


Sheldon Adelson threatens to walk away from Raiders stadium deal

NCAA set to distribute some revenue based on academic performance

Tom Brady nixes a future in coaching, blames lack of patience

Report: NFL interviewed Cowboys RB Ezekiel Elliott about domestic incident

Aldon Smith has applied for reinstatement to the NFL

Bill Polian suggests NFL step in if Browns trade Joe Thomas

CFB Crash Course Week 9: The underachievers already out of playoff contention

College Football Playoff set-up could keep best teams out of title contention

Box Score 10/28: London, Wrigley and the Cell

Four NBA teams that could surprise this season

NHL in three players: Carey Price is the MVP of sports

Rex Ryan: Pats’ violation of unwritten rule led to skirmish

LeBron doesn’t want Thompson bringing Khloe around Cavs?

NFL ratings decline is also hurting the restaurant business

WATCH: Breaking down the current state of the 76ers

Five things we have learned thus far in the World Series

Can Hell in a Cell still bring the heat?

Darrelle Revis: ‘My body’s breaking down’

MLB News
Delivered to your inbox
You'll also receive Yardbarker's daily Top 10, featuring the best sports stories from around the web. Customize your newsletter to get articles on your favorite sports and teams. And the best part? It's free!

By clicking "Sign Me Up", you have read and agreed to the Fox Sports Digital Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. You can opt out at any time. For more information, please see our Privacy Policy.
Get it now!
Ios_download En_app_rgb_wo_45

CFB Crash Course Week 9: The underachievers already out of playoff contention

College Football Playoff set-up could keep best teams out of title contention

WATCH: Breaking down the current state of the 76ers

Five things we have learned thus far in the World Series

Can Hell in a Cell still bring the heat?

We’re doing the Bountygate thing again

Significant firsts for women's wrestling in WWE at 'Hell in a Cell'

One Gotta Go: Pac-12 players and coaches vs. the worst pickup ballers

A look back at 10 of the best-looking World Series

25 questions heading into the 2016-17 NBA season

Today's Best Stuff
For Publishers
Company Info
Follow Yardbarker