Originally posted on Taking Bad Schotz  |  Last updated 8/2/13

When Metta World Peace signed with the Knicks on July 16, it was a homecoming for the Queens native. The man formerly known as Ron Artest grew up as a Knicks fan, and follows in a long line of New Yorkers natives who had an opportunity to play in Madison Square Garden for their hometown team. Here are the top five Knicks that were born in New York City. NOTE: I am only considering the five boroughs as New York City. NYC suburbs are not included. Honorable Mention: Stephon Marbury- When Marbury was traded to the Knicks on January 5, 2004, it was definitely considered a homecoming. Marbury grew up in Brooklyn as a Knicks fan, but it didn’t take long for him to turn from hometown hero to clubhouse cancer. He constantly fought with head coaches Larry Brown and Isaiah Thomas, and as a result, the team earned zero playoff wins in his five seasons there. Marbury actually played pretty well in those seasons, averaging over 18 points in a Knicks uniform, but he will undoubtedly be remembered for the chaos he brought to the Big Apple. via blog.stack.com  5. Mark Jackson- Jackson, a Brooklyn native who played his college basketball at nearby St. John’s, was drafted by the Knicks in the 1st round of the 1987 NBA Draft. Playing with Patrick Ewing and Charles Oakley, Jackson immediately excelled, averaging 13.6 points and 10.6 assists in his first season en route to winning the Rookie of the Year Award. The next season, Jackson bumped his scoring up to 16.9 points per game, the highest of his career. Unfortunately, Jackson was traded to the Los Angeles Clippers in 1992, just missing out on back-to-back division titles and a trip to the 1994 NBA Finals. via icgaels.com 4. Richie Guerin- Guerin, a point guard who played for the Knicks from 1956-1963, was one of the most beloved players in team history. Born in The Bronx, he attended Iona for college while in the Marine Corps Reserve. He was drafted by his hometown Knicks in the 1954 NBA Draft, but service in the Marines prevented him from playing until 1956. He turned out to be worth the wait, as he became a six-time All- Star and one of the top scorers in the league. His best season came in 1961-62, where he averaged a whopping 29.5 points and nearly seven assists per game. Like Marbury, he didn’t achieve any playoff success, but unlike Marbury, he left the team on good terms. In Guerin’s first game back at Madison Square Garden after he was traded to the St. Louis Hawks, he received a five minute standing ovation from the crowd- something that the disgruntled Knicks fans from the Isaiah Thomas era would never do. Photo Credit: Associated Press/File 3. Dick McGuire- McGuire, another Bronx native, was drafted by the Knicks in the 1st round of the 1949 NBA Draft, and spent the first eight years of his career in New York. In that time, he made the All-Star Game five times, and he helped the Knicks capture three straight conference championships (1951-1953). Despite losing all three championship series, including two that went seven games, McGuire’s efforts earned him a spot in the Basketball Hall of Fame, and led to the Knicks retiring his #15 jersey in 1992, despite the fact that the number had previously been retired for Earl Monroe. Photo Credit: Associated Press 2. Carmelo Anthony- I know he moved to Baltimore when he was young, but since there were “Coming Home” advertisements when ‘Melo first came to the Knicks, he definitely qualifies as a hometown player. Anthony was traded from the Denver Nuggets to the Knicks in 2011, and he, along with Amar’e Stoudemire and Tyson Chandler, has helped revive the Knicks and bring them back into the playoffs. In his two and a half years in New York, the Brooklyn native has put up ridiculous numbers, including a league leading 28.1 points as well as 8.0 rebounds per game this past season, Some highlights from the season included a 50-point game (with no turnovers) against the Miami Heat, and a streak of three straight 40-point games, which has not been done by a Knick since the man right below him on the list did nearly three decades ago. Anthony has brought the Knicks to three straight playoffs, but despite playing very well, he has yet to guide his team past the second round. If he can bring a long-awaited title to New York, he would likely vault to the top spot. Photo Credit: Harry Hamburg 1. Bernard King- King, a Brooklyn native, played five seasons for the New Jersey Nets, Utah Jazz and Golden State Warriors before coming to the Knicks in 1982. In his five memorable seasons for the Knicks, King, a 6’7” small forward, was one of the best scorers in the league, thanks in a large part to his terrific turnaround jumper. Among his many highlights in New York, King scored 50 points in back-to-back games and became the tenth player ever to score 60 points in a game in 1983-84, averaged 34.8 points per game in the 1984 playoffs, and led the NBA with 32.9 points per game in 1984-85. Unfortunately for him, he tore his right ACL on March 23, 1985, which caused him to miss the entire 1985-86 season. The injury derailed King’s career, as the Knicks released him in 1987, and he was out of the league by 1993. Despite the sad ending to his Knicks career, King still goes down as one of the five or six best players in Knicks history, and I have absolutely no idea why his #30 is not retired. -Hollenberg

GET THE YARDBARKER APP:
Ios_download En_app_rgb_wo_45
MORE FROM YARDBARKER

Report: Chris Paul, Spurs may have ‘mutual interest’ in deal

Antonio Brown tweets great reaction to relaxed celebration rules

Report: Timberwolves interested in signing Derrick Rose

Report: NFL teams raising ‘concerns’ over games in London

Doctors unsure whether Isaiah Thomas needs hip surgery

LIKE WHAT YOU SEE?
GET THE DAILY NEWSLETTER:

NBA will bring All-Star Game back to Charlotte in 2019

Chelsea cancels Premier League victory parade amid Manchester attack

Rob Gronkowski on field for start of OTAs

Report: Myles Garrett sidelined with minor injury at OTAs

Homer Simpson to be inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame

Richard Jefferson says LeBron James was ill during Game 3

The 'Farewell to the Manu, the Myth, the Legend' quiz

Box Score 5/24: Craig Anderson saves the Senators

The 'Walk on home, boy' quiz

NBA Referee Hotline Bling: Dejounte Murray gets his calls blocked twice

It's reality check time for the Texas Rangers

Box Score 5/23: Preds, Warriors move on to respective Finals

The 10 best sports docs available for streaming

Why wait? Our too soon Cavaliers-Warriors NBA Finals preview

NBA Weekend Awards: Who will take a bite of the Snow White Crystal Apple?

The 'How two award snubs might shake up the NBA' quiz

Preparing for the BIG3: Q&A with BIG3 co-founder Jeff Kwatinetz

Two months in and Nintendo's Switch dominates 2017 video game market

NBA News
Delivered to your inbox
You'll also receive Yardbarker's daily Top 10, featuring the best sports stories from around the web. Customize your newsletter to get articles on your favorite sports and teams. And the best part? It's free!

By clicking "Sign Me Up", you have read and agreed to the Fox Sports Digital Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. You can opt out at any time. For more information, please see our Privacy Policy.
the YARDBARKER app
Get it now!
Ios_download En_app_rgb_wo_45

Why the Indianapolis 500 is called 'the greatest spectacle in racing'

The 'Farewell to the Manu, the Myth, the Legend' quiz

NBA Referee Hotline Bling: Dejounte Murray gets his calls blocked twice

It's reality check time for the Texas Rangers

The 'Walk on home, boy' quiz

NBA Weekend Awards: Who will take a bite of the Snow White Crystal Apple?

Why wait? Our too soon Cavaliers-Warriors NBA Finals preview

The 10 best sports docs available for streaming

The 'How two award snubs might shake up the NBA' quiz

Preparing for the BIG3: Q&A with BIG3 co-founder Jeff Kwatinetz

Today's Best Stuff
For Publishers
Company Info
Help
Follow Yardbarker