President Mark Emmert and the NCAA are preparing to prevent any championship events in North Carolina for the next five years. Kyle Terada/USA TODAY Sports

The NCAA is reportedly close to extending its ban on holding championship events in the state of North Carolina for another five years if the state’s controversial HB2 bill isn’t repealed in the next 12 days, according Luke DeCock of Raleigh’s News-Observer.

According to DeCock, the North Carolina Sports Association informed the North Carolina General Assembly of the NCAA’s intentions in a letter on Monday.

DeCock goes on to explain what the NCAA’s process will be in “banning” North Carolina from hosting events, mainly just by ignoring their bids.

The letter the N.C. Sports Association sent legislators on Monday spells it out in brutal detail. The NCAA’s individual sports committees will, over the next 7-10 days, convene to begin their final deliberations about event sites for the 2018-19 through 2021-22 academic years. Those decisions will come at the end of the month. They have been instructed to exclude all 133 of North Carolina’s bids from consideration if HB2 is still on the books.

And following those decisions, the NCAA will look to move first and second round basketball tournament games from Charlotte in 2018 (which were announced way back in 2014).

Once the state is out of the running for those four years, the NCAA will act quickly to pull next year’s events from the state, including the NCAA basketball first and second rounds set for Charlotte.

In September, the NCAA moved nine events out of North Carolina because of the controversial law, including the first and second round basketball tournament scheduled for Greensboro. The ACC also pulled events from North Carolina in September for the 2016-17 academic year, including the league’s football championship game.