Posted January 19, 2013 on AP on Fox
Former-louis-cardinals
One was born in St. Louis, the other became a star there. Aside from that, Earl Weaver and Stan Musial were about as different as two Hall of Famers could be. ''Talk about your odd couple,'' said George Vecsey, the longtime sports columnist for the New York Times who wrote a recent biography of Musial. Weaver was a 5-foot-6 rabble rouser whose penchant for quarreling with umpires belied a cerebral approach to managing that has stood the test of time. Musial was a humble slugger with a funky batting stance who was beloved by Cardinals fans and respected by pretty much everyone else. Saturday began with news of Weaver's death at age 82, and by the end of the night Musial had died, too, leaving baseball to reflect on two very different but very distinguished careers. ''Earl was well known for being one of the game's most colorful characters with a memorable wit, but he was also amongst its most loyal,'' Commissioner Bud Selig said. Selig later released a statement after Musial's death at age 92. ''Stan's life embodies baseball's unparalleled history and why this game is the national pastime. As remarkable as `Stan the Man' was on the field, he was a true gentleman in life,'' Selig said. A three-time MVP and seven-time National League batting champion, Musial helped the Cardinals win three World Series championships in the 1940s. His popularity in St. Louis can be measured by the not one, but two statues that stand in his honor outside Busch Stadium. After his death Saturday, Cardinals of more recent vintage began offering condolences almost immediately. ''Sad to hear about Stan the Man, it's an honor to wear the same uniform,'' said a message posted on the Twitter account of Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday. Albert Pujols, who led St. Louis to World Series titles in 2006 and 2011 before leaving as a free agent before last season, offered prayers for Musial's family via Twitter. ''I will cherish my friendship with Stan for as long as I live,'' said a message posted on Pujols' site. ''Rest in Peace.'' Weaver was born in St. Louis, but his greatest success came as a manager in Baltimore. He took the Orioles to the World Series four times over 17 seasons, winning one title in 1970. Never a fan of smallball strategies like bunting and stealing bases, Weaver preferred to wait for a three-run homer, always hoping for a big inning that could break the game open. ''No one managed a ballclub or pitching staff better than Earl,'' said Davey Johnson, who played under Weaver with the Orioles. Johnson now manages the Washington Nationals and ran the Orioles from 1996-97. ''He was decades ahead of his time,'' Johnson said. ''Not a game goes by that I don't draw on something Earl did or said. I will miss him every day.'' While Musial could let his bat do the talking, Weaver was more than willing to shout to be heard. His salty-tongued arguing with umpires will live on through YouTube, and Orioles programs sold at the old Memorial Stadium frequently featured photos of Weaver squabbling. Former umpire Don Denkinger remembered a game in which the manager disputed a call with Larry McCoy at the plate. ''Earl tells us, `Now I'm gonna show you how stupid you all are.' Earl goes down to first base and ejects the first base umpire. Then he goes to second base and ejects the second base umpire. I'm working third base and now he comes down and ejects me,'' Denkinger said. Musial was a quieter type whose hitting exploits were on par with contemporaries Ted Williams and Joe DiMaggio - but without the bright lights of the big city. ''I knew Stan very well. He used to take care of me at All-Star games, 24 of them,'' Hall of Famer Willie Mays said. ''He was a true gentleman who understood the race thing and did all he could. Again, a true gentleman on and off the field - I never heard anybody say a bad word about him, ever.''
THE BACKYARD
BEST OF MAXIM
RELATED ARTICLES
REST IN PEACE

Hall of Famer Stan Musial dies at 92

Hall of Fame ballplayer Stan Musial, who spent his entire career with the St. Louis Cardinals, died on Saturday at the age of 92.

Video: Here’s Stan Musial Playing “Take Me Out To The Ball Game” on the Harmonica

Stan Musial, by any measure one of the greatest ever to play the game of baseball, died yesterday at his St. Louis-area home. He was 92. The St. Louis Cardinals signed Musial as a pitcher in 1937, but he didn’t spend much time on the mound. In his 22 seasons with the Cardinals (from 1941–1963, taking a break to serve in the Navy in 1945), “Stan the Man” compiled 3,630 hits...

Press Release: Funeral Arrangements for Stan Musial Announced

Public visitation will be Thursday and the funeral mass Saturday at the Cathedral Bailica of St. Louis. ST. LOUIS, January 21, 2013 – The St. Louis Cardinals announced that the family of Stan Musial has made the following funeral and public visitation arrangements for the Cardinals Hall of Famer. A public visitation is planned for Thursday, January 24th from 2 P.M. to 8 P.M....

A sad day in baseball continues: Stan Musial passes away at 92

The Man.  What a nickname.  Can there be a better one?  Stan Musial was one of the best baseball players in the history of the game and pretty much defines what it means to be a St. Louis Cardinal.  A 1969 Hall of Fame inductee, a 3 time MVP, and a 24 time All-Star, he was consistently great for so long, that sometimes his name can get lost in when mentioning the all-time greats...

Baseball loses Stan Musial and Earl Weaver on the same day

Major League Baseball lost two legends of the game today: the man who re-pioneered the concept of the passionate, fiery, ornery manager in Earl Weaver. He’s one of the biggest names in the history of the Baltimore Orioles organization. Also passing unfortunately was Mr. St. Louis Cardinals Stan Musial. When he retired in 1963, Musial held 17 major league, 29 National League and...

Remembering Stan Musial on WFAN Radio

On Sunday morning, I was the guest of host Lori Rubinson on New York’s WFAN 660 Radio. Our subject was the life of St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Famer Stan Musial. The greatest player in team history passed away Saturday at the age of 92. In the following audio interview, we touched on some of Musial’s many statistical milestones as Stan the Man, but our focus was more on Stan...

Stan Musial passes away at age 92

One of baseball’s greatest players has passed away at age 92. Stan Musial’s resume was as impressive as anyone. A hall of fame player, Musial won seven National League batting titles, three MVP awards and was part of three World Series championships for the Cardinals during the 1940s. Musial passed away in his home. His son-in-law informed the Cardinals of his death. “We have...

Stan Musial passes away at 92

ST. LOUIS The greatest Cardinal of them all has passed away. Hall of famer Stan Musial, winner of three MVP Awards and holder of nearly all franchise records from his 22-year career with the Cardinals, died Saturday at the age of 92. Musial, the first player in franchise history to have his number retired, passed away at his home in Ladue, Mo., with his family by his side. "...

Stan Musial Tribute Articles Compendium

As promised, a list of articles that have been written about Stan Musial since his passing on Saturday night.  Some you might have read already, some you might have missed. Either way, there is no lack of great words penned for a great man.  Enjoy... NY Times: LINK HERE Sports On Earth: LINK HERE Riverfront Times: LINK HERE Viva El Birdos: LINK HERE ...

Stan "The Man" Musial passes away at age 92

It is a sad night for Cardinals fan everywhere as it was reported earlier that Stan Musial passed away today at the age of 92.  Many fans gathered at his statue outside of Busch Stadium to remember him.  Musial is one of the greatest hitters of all time and a true Cardinals legend.  In his 22 year career, he compiled 475 HR's and a .331/.417/.559 line. He spent his entire...

Stan Musial was perhaps as close to perfect as sports can get

Stan “The Man” Musial was unquestionably the greatest player to ever wear a St. Louis Cardinals uniform, but he was also one of the greatest people to wear any kind of sports uniform. Musial died Saturday at age 92, and for the next several days many tributes will highlight his work on and off the field. He deserves every single one of them. Musial was a great baseball player...

Stan Musial Dead at 92 … The Primary Baseball Icon of the Midwest, ‘The Man’ Will Be Missed

With the bright prospects of pitchers and catchers reporting to Spring Training in just three weeks, Saturday, January 19, was a cold, dark day for Major League Baseball fans. Early in the morning it was announced that the great Earl Weaver had died. Roughly 12 hours later, reports arrived indicating that Stan “the Man” Musial passed away in his suburban St. Louis home. He...

Remembering 'the Man'

ST. LOUIS - The first person arrived just minutes after Stan Musial's death went public and the crowd continued to grow. Soon the group was big enough to block two lanes of traffic, yet nobody seemed to care. In a moving tribute to the greatest baseball player in the history of the storied St. Louis Cardinals franchise, hundreds of fans gathered near his statue late Saturday...

Wezen-Ball: Earl Weaver and Stan Musial, Together by Larry Granillo

A quick look back at an early 1952 game.

Production Business

I honestly had every intention on this being about the baseball writers not electing anyone for the hall of fame this year, and not really thinking it was that big a deal. And then Lance decided to talk to Oprah. With that, then the game plan changed to make this about Lance, and Barry, and Roger, and PEDs, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. And then America got swooped...
MLB News
Delivered to your inbox
You'll also receive Yardbarker's daily Top 10, featuring the best sports stories from around the web. Customize your newsletter to get articles on your favorite sports and teams. And the best part? It's free!

Today's Best Stuff
For Bloggers

Join the Yardbarker Network for more promotion, traffic, and money.

Company Info
Help
What is Yardbarker?

Yardbarker is the largest network of sports blogs and pro athlete blogs on the web. This site is the hub of the Yardbarker Network, where our editors and algorithms curate the best sports content from our network and beyond.