Originally written on Seahawk Addicts  |  Last updated 11/10/14
(Note: Since I was redoing my spreadsheets anyway, I went ahead and revamped the tables I've been using for the stats articles as well.  That part took a heck of a lot longer than I thought it would, but such is life.) Entering their bye week, the Seahawks’ record stands at 6-4 with six games left to play in the season.  Last year, the team was 4-6 after ten games, and in 2010 they were 5-5 with three of those wins coming against some truly awful Rams and Cardinals squads. It wasn’t that long ago that most everyone pretty much took it as a given that the Seahawks were probably going to lose whenever they played a top-ten team.  We’d still scream our throats out for the Hawks to win, but we all knew that a victory was probably not going to happen.  This year, they’ve beaten the Patriots and their 1st-ranked offense as well as the Packers and their 10th-ranked offense and 9th-ranked defense. The Vikings sit just outside that top tier with their 14th-ranked offense and defense, but their 6-4 season record is reason enough to be proud of that win, too. And as frustrating as all four losses have been, they only lost by an average of 5.25 points in those games.  Compare that to 2011, when the Seahawks were outscored in their losses by an average of 9.78 points, or 2010, when nine regular season opponents blew them out of the water by a 21 point average margin of victory. After this bye week, the Seahawks will face two back-to-back road games in Miami and Chicago that may very well determine whether they make the playoffs this year.  The Dolphins have been surprisingly good this year, although the strongest team they’ve managed to beat so far is the Bengals, and the Bears’ 2nd ranked defense is at or near the top of the league in nearly every statistical category.  If they win one of those games, they should have a good shot at winning a wild card berth; if they win both, wresting the division crown from the 49ers falls within the realm of possibility, too. (Note, for explanations of some of the stats included in this piece, please see the first article in the series.) Rushing Averages   Game Yards/Rushing Attempt Yards/Game   Yards/Rushing Attempt Allowed Yards/Game Allowed 1 (ARI) 3.48 115   2.15 43 2 (DAL) 4.44 182   3.06 49 3 (GB) 4.38 127   4.00 84 4 (STL) 5.26 179   2.78 75 5 (CAR) 2.80 98   4.32 82 6 (NE) 3.27 85   3.35 87 7 (SF) 4.69 136   5.47 175 8 (DET) 7.00 133   3.82 84 9 (MIN) 4.33 195   9.00 243 10 (NYJ) 4.05 174   3.82 84 Total 4.26 (11th) 142.4 (7th)   4.34 (21st) 100.6 (12th) After a statistical drop in weeks five and six, over the last four games the Seahawks’ rushing stats have moved back up into the 4+ yds/att territory where they belong.  Really, when you’ve got a runner like Marshawn Lynch in your backfield, anything less is unacceptable.   That said, there’s a false positive lurking in the stats here.  Seattle’s rushing attack performed well against the 49ers, Vikings, and Jets, but Lynch’s 77-yard touchdown run in the Lions game artificially inflated the numbers for what was an otherwise lackluster showing.  The Seahawks averaged just 3.11 yds/att on every other carry in that game, and Lynch himself posted a dismal 2.33 yds/att on his 11 other rushing attempts.  Being able to pull off explosive plays like that is important to the success of any offense, but it’s no substitute for being able to sustain an acceptable level of production throughout a whole game. Individually, Lynch is currently averaging 4.74 yds/att this season, plus he’s now officially rushed for 1,000 yards in each of his first two seasons with the Seahawks.  Better yet, he’s only 26, so as long as the team watches his touches and doesn’t wear him out unnecessarily (he’s already racked up 212 carries this season) there should be plenty of Beast Mode left in his tank.  His backup Robert Turbin is doing respectably well, averaging 3.98 yds/att on his 42 carries.  He’s not quite the battering ram that Lynch is, but he’s a shifty runner and it doesn’t take him long to accelerate up to full speed. Unfortunately, the run defense has not fared quite so well.  At the beginning of the season, the Seahawks’ ability to stonewall opposing running backs was widely considered to be one of the team’s core strengths, but over the last four weeks they’ve allowed teams to rush for an average of 5.67 yds/att.  It’s one thing to get mauled by a great run blocker like the 49ers’ Mike Iupati or an all-pro runner like the Vikings’ Adrian Peterson, but it’s quite another to let the Lions’ Mikel Leshoure run you over for 4.6 yds/att. The middle of the line has been particularly vulnerable, so Bobby Wagner has a share in the blame here, but I’ve also been seing Brandon Mebane and Alan Branch get shoved backwards on a concerning number of plays.  Unless the team has been violating league rules by keeping those two off the daily injury reports, I’m not entirely sure what their problem has been.  Here’s hoping the coaching staff can correct whatever’s gone wrong during the bye week, ‘cause I’m not enjoying the sight of opposing rushers bursting into the clear at top speed with Seahawks defenders trailing in their wake. (To continue reading, please click on "Read More" below.) Passing Averages   Offense Game Yards/Passing Attempt Yards/ Pass Completion Net Passing Yards/Game Completion % Touchdown % Interception % 1 (ARI) 4.50 8.50 139 52.94 2.94 2.94 2 (DAL) 7.55 10.07 133 75.00 5.00 0.00 3 (GB) 6.19 13.00 111 47.62 9.52 0.00 4 (STL) 6.40 9.41 140 68.00 0.00 12.00 5 (CAR) 8.84 11.63 212 76.00 4.11 8.00 6 (NE) 10.85 18.31 283 59.26 11.11 0.00 7 (SF) 5.30 13.56 115 39.13 0.00 4.35 8 (DET) 6.74 9.44 236 71.43 5.71 2.86 9 (MIN) 7.92 11.65 190 68.00 12.00 0.00 10 (NYJ) 10.55 16.23 189 65.00 15.00 0.00 Total 7.35 11.79 174.8 62.35 6.27 3.14 Defense 1 (ARI) 5.97 10.75 210 55.56 2.78 2.78 2 (DAL) 6.28 10.91 247 57.50 2.50 2.50 3 (GB) 5.72 8.58 184 66.67 0.00 0.00 4 (STL) 7.19 13.12 211 54.84 3.23 3.23 5 (CAR) 4.86 11.75 108 41.38 0.00 0.00 6 (NE) 6.81 10.97 388 62.07 3.45 3.45 7 (SF) 6.09 10.00 138 60.87 4.35 4.35 8 (DET) 7.18 10.35 331 69.39 6.12 2.04 9 (MIN) 2.82 5.64 43 50.00 0.00 4.55 10 (NYJ) 5.28 11.00 101 48.00 0.00 4.00 Total 6.06 10.41 196.1 58.24 2.56 2.56 For the passing offense, less has been more this year.  The Seahawks may be 32nd in the NFL in pass attempts, but as you can see from the table they rank much higher in more meaningful stats like touchdown percentage (5th), yards per attempt (11th), yards per completion (11th), and completion percentage (15th).  So yes, they may not sling the ball as often as everyone else in the league, but when they do they’ve been getting the job done. I said in a previous article that I wanted to see Russell Wilson get the job done against a defense that’s been strong against the pass, and he did just that last Sunday.  Yes, he was a little too confident in the early going and paid for it, but by the end of the game he still managed to complete 63.16% of his passes for two touchdowns and 9.89 yds/att.   Hawk Blogger already beat me to the punch, but it bears repeating: the Seahawks appear to have found their next franchise quarterback.  To put it another way, does anyone still think it would be a good idea to bench Wilson in favor of Matt Flynn?  He’s mobile, he throws accurately at all three levels (short, medium, and long), and he’s willing to spend the long hours in the film room it takes to improve his on-field performance.  Barring a never-ending sophomore slump like Rick Mirer’s, Wilson is going to be around for many seasons to come. On defense, the Seahawks have been solid against the pass.  Earl Thomas’ range is incredible, Kam Chancellor is a , and the 6’+ cornerback tandem experiment has been a rousing success – when’s the last time you saw corners who could jam wide receivers at the line of scrimmage with a one-handed stiff-arm as effectively as Richard Sherman and Brandon Browner?  Seriously, those two are like the sons Mel Blount never knew he had. But despite all they’ve accomplished, the defense has also proven to have a gaping soft spot in the short middle zones.  They seemed to tighten up their coverage in that area against the Vikings and Jets, but while Christian Ponder has been relatively okay this season, the only reason Mark Sanchez is playing is because the Jets inexplicably traded for a backup QB who’s an even worse passer than Sanchez..  I’d rather wait until I’ve seen the Seahawks put in an improved performance against a better quarterback than those two before I declare the problem fixed.   Game Sacks (%) Sacks Allowed (%) Sack Differential QB Hits QB Hits Allowed Sack & QB Hit Diff. Sacks & QB Hits % Sacks & QB Hits Allowed % 1 (ARI) 1 (2.7%) 3 (8.11%) -2 5 7 -4 16.22 27.03 2 (DAL) 1 (2.44%) 2 (9.09%) -1 6 4 1 17.07 27.27 3 (GB) 8 (17.02%) 1 (4.55%) 7 12 3 16 42.55 18.18 4 (STL) 2 (6.06%) 2 (7.41%) 0 3 4 -1 15.15 22.22 5 (CAR) 4 (12.12%) 2 (7.41%) 2 6 2 6 30.30 14.81 6 (NE) 1 (1.69%) 2 (6.90%) -1 5 6 -2 10.17 27.59 7 (SF) 2 (8.00%) 2 (8.00%) 0 3 3 0 20.00 20.00 8 (DET) 2 (3.92%) 0 (0.00%) 2 7 3 6 17.65 8.57 9 (MIN) 4 (15.38%) 1 (3.85%) 3 7 5 5 42.31 23.08 10 (NYJ) 3 (10.71% 4 (16.67%) -1 4 7 -4 25.00 45.83 Total 28 (7.37%) 19 (6.93%) 9 58 44 23 22.63 22.99 Wilson hasn't been sacked much this season, but as you can see from the table above he's been knocked around plenty, and the game against New York was a particularly bad night for Wilson.  The rookie QB held on to the ball way too long and tried to extend plays in situations where he should’ve just thrown the ball away, but his line didn’t do him a lot of favors either against a Jets pass rush that has been relatively anemic all season long.   The Seahawks’ pass rush has been on fire lately.  Against their last four opponents, they’ve averaged 2.75 sacks per game and 5.25 quarterback hits per game.  Chris Clemons and Bruce Irvin are sitting on 7 sacks apiece, and between Brandon Mebane, Jason Jones, Alan Branch, and Greg Scruggs, the interior pass rush – a weak spot for the team ever since Rocky Bernard left – has already generated 8.5 sacks this season.  We all hoped the addition of Irvin and Jones would help out the pass rush, but I don’t think anyone expected the team to be 2nd in the NFL in total sacks and 4th in sack percentage. Every time Irvin gets a sack, I get a mental image of someone punching Mel Kiper, Jr. in the face.  I just felt like sharing that. Special Teams Averages   Game Yards/Kick Return Yards/Punt Return Field Goal % Yards/Punt Net Yards/Punt Yards/Kick Return Allowed Yards/Punt Return Allowed 1 (ARI) 44.33 12.50 75 46.25 37.00 22.00 9.25 2 (DAL) 20.00 7.00 100 53.75 53.25 21.80 1.00 3 (GB) 21.00 2.50 - 51.50 49.50 23.00 4.00 4 (STL) 69.00 0.50 100 49.00 44.50 12.00 18.00 5 (CAR) 16.00 7.80 100 40.67 36.33 20.25 13.00 6 (NE) 20.00 14.50 100 60.00 43.00 21.50 17.00 7 (SF) - 2.50 75 48.50 31.00 20.50 23.33 8 (DET) 17.00 9.67 50 48.33 46.33 21.00 6.00 9 (MIN) 19.00 10.50 100 48.75 48.50 26.33 0.33 10 (NYJ) 17.00 13.33 - 42.50 41.50 27.00 3.00 Total 25.33 (11th) 8.69 (18th) 83.33% (22nd) 48.95 (3rd)) 43.40 () 22.26 (10th) 9.71 (21st) Leon Washington hasn’t gotten free for a long gain on a kick return in a while, but he’s been within a hair’s breadth of doing it a few times.  Sometimes the return game is fickle that way.  He has been getting decent production on his punt returns lately, though, which is just as good. The punt coverage unit has also had some trouble corralling punt returners, but they’ve been stout on kickoff coverage and they have yet to give up a return TD of any sort. Steven Hauschka is a perfect 14-for-14 on field goal tries of 49 yards or less, but he’s 1-for-4 on field goal tries of 50+ yards.  Converting on those shorter kicks is important, but unless his accuracy at long range improves significantly I’d expect the team to bring in some competition for the job next year through free agency or the draft. I know I say this just about every week, but Jon Ryan is one hell of a punter.  I know everyone seems to think that punters are a dime a dozen, but finding a guy who can get the hang time, distance, and placement that Ryan does on his punts is almost harder to do than finding a franchise QB.  The defense has benefited greatly from the breathing space he’s been able to buy them whenever an offensive drive stalls out.  Locking him up with a long term contract was one of the few truly great decisions Tim Ruskell made as the Seahawks’ general manager. Run-Pass & Turnover Differential   Game Run-Pass Differential Turnover Differential Result 1 (ARI) +11 0 Loss 2 (DAL) +17 +2 Win 3 (GB) -8 0 Win 4 (STL) +7 -2 Loss 5 (CAR) +23 -1 Win 6 (NE) -20 0 Win 7 (SF) -8 0 Loss 8 (DET) -12 -1 Loss 9 (MIN) +24 +2 Win 10 (NYJ) +22 +1 Win After pulling off some low-percentage wins early in the season against the Packers and Patriots, the law of averages finally caught up to the Seahawks against the 49ers and Lions.  Granted, the Hawks were only beaten by a touchdown or less in both of those games, but teams that finished games similarly in 2011 – negative run-pass and equal turnover differential versus San Francisco, negative in both differentials versus Detroit –  won just 27.3% and 8.3% of the time, respectively. That’s why it’s so heartening to see the Seahawks pull off two wins in a row in which they were positive in both differentials, because that’s a very high percentage win (91.7%, to be specific).  Again, the Vikings have been decent, but the Jets’ offense is terrible, so we’re going to have to wait until at least the Miami game to see if this is an actual improvement we’re seeing here or just a statistical outlier. Toxic Differential   Game Explosive Plays Explosive Plays Allowed Explosive Play Differential Takeaways Turnovers Turnover Differential Toxic Differential 1 (ARI) 2 6 -4 2 2 0 -4 2 (DAL) 6 6 0 2 0 +2 +2 3 (GB) 4 3 +1 0 0 0 +1 4 (STL) 6 5 +1 1 3 -2 -1 5 (CAR) 5 6 -1 2 3 -1 -2 6 (NE) 6 7 -1 2 2 0 -1 7 (SF) 5 5 0 1 1 0 0 8 (DET) 6 6 0 1 2 -1 -1 9 (MIN) 9 8 +1 2 0 +2 +3 10 (NYJ) 9 2 +7 3 2 +1 +8 Total 58 54 +4 16 (9th) 15 (15th) +1 +5 (Note: Explosive plays are defined here using Brian Billick’s criteria of 12+ yards for runs and 16+ for passes.) After bobbing around below the zero line for most of the season, the Seahawks pushed themselves firmly back up into the black with their crushing defeat of the Jets.  In case you’re wondering, the team has both made more and allowed more explosive plays through the air this season than it has on the ground.  The offense has racked up 38 explosive pass completions and 20 explosive runs through ten games, while the defense has allowed 34 explosive pass completions and 20 explosive runs.  The defense was doing much better in the explosive run category prior to the Minnesota game, where they allowed Adrian Peterson to rush for 12+ yards eight times.  Both of the Jets’ two explosive plays were passes. Down Efficiency   Game 4+ Yards on 1st Down 4+ Yards Allowed on 1st Down 1 (ARI) 10 (34.48%) 19 (65.52%) 7 (26.92%) 19 (73.08%) 2 (DAL) 9 (36.00%) 16 (64.00%) 9 (37.50%) 15 (62.50%) 3 (GB) 14 (70.00%) 6 (30.00%) 13 (48.15%) 14 (51.85%) 4 (STL) 19 (67.86%) 9 (32.14%) 11 (44.00%) 14 (56.00%) 5 (CAR) 13 (48.15%) 14 (51.85%) 10 (43.48%) 13 (56.52%) 6 (NE) 16 (66.67%) 8 (33.33%) 20 (55.56%) 16 (44.44%) 7 (SF) 13 (56.52%) 10 (43.48%) 11 (40.74%) 16 (59.26%) 8 (DET) 14 (53.85%) 12 (46.15%) 15 (46.88%) 17 (53.13%) 9 (MIN) 18 (56.25%) 14 (43.75%) 10 (41.67%) 14 (58.33%) 10 (NYJ) 11 (37.93%) 18 (62.07%) 12 (57.14%) 9 (42.86%) Total 137 (52.09%) 126 (47.91%) 118 (44.53%) 147 (55.47%) The Seahawks have dominated on 1st down for most of the year, but against the Jets they were held below 40% efficiency in yardage gained for the first time since week two.  Then again, all four of Seattle’s touchdown plays in that game came on 1st down, with three of them being explosive pass completions and the fourth being a one-yard scoring run by Lynch, so I wouldn’t worry too terribly much about those numbers. More concerning is the defense allowing New York to gain 4+ yards on over 50% of their 1st down plays.  Granted, it’s only the second time they’ve allowed a team to do that all season, but it’s always a concern when the offense pulling it off is one that’s as bad as the Jets’.  There’s no need to panic just yet, but it bears watching over the next few weeks to see if this is a new trend or just a fluke.   Game Conversions on 1st & 2nd Down Conversions on 3rd & 4th Down Conversions Allowed on 1st & 2nd Down Conversions Allowed on 3rd & 4th Down 1 (ARI) 9 (45.00%) 11 (55.00%) 12 (66.67%) 6 (33.33%) 2 (DAL) 10 (52.63%) 9 (47.37%) 10 (58.82%) 7 (41.18%) 3 (GB) 7 (63.64%) 4 (36.36%) 10 (47.62%) 11 (52.38%) 4 (STL) 16 (80.00%) 4 (20.00%) 7 (41.18%) 10 (58.82%) 5 (CAR) 9 (50.00%) 9 (50.00%) 9 (69.23%) 4 (30.77%) 6 (NE) 10 (62.50%) 6 (37.50%) 17 (58.62%) 12 (41.38%) 7 (SF) 8 (53.33%) 7 (46.67%) 15 (75.00%) 5 (25.00%) 8 (DET) 16 (72.73%) 6 (27.27%) 15 (57.69%) 11 (42.31%) 9 (MIN) 20 (74.07%) 7 (25.93%) 12 (70.59%) 5 (29.41%) 10 (NYJ) 12 (66.67%) 6 (33.33%) 8 (72.73%) 3 (27.27%) Total 117 (62.90%) 69 (37.10%) 115 (60.85%) 74 (39.15%) (Note: as always, down conversions by penalty and all scoring plays are included in the above stats.) It’s always good to see your team make the vast majority of its conversions on 1st and 2nd down plays, but for much of the season that percentage has been high not because the Seahawks have been particularly great at making conversions on their early downs but because they’ve been so very awful at converting on 3rd down.  As you’ll see in the next table, that trend is still unfortunately alive and well, although they improved somewhat in that area against the Jets. As you can see, the percentages for the defense are quite similar, but in their case that’s a good thing.  Aside from the Detroit game, they’ve been quite good at stopping teams on third down over the last month.   Offense Game Converted 3rd & ≤1 Converted 3rd & 2-3 Converted 3rd & 4-6 Converted 3rd 7-10 Converted 3rd & 11+ Converted 3rd (Total) 1 (ARI) 1 of 1 (100%) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 2 of 7 (28.57%) 2 of 4 (50.00%) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 7 of 16 (43.75%) 2 (DAL) 2 of 2 (100%) 2 of 4 (50.00%) 4 of 5 (80.00%) 0 of 2 (0.00%) 0 of 3 (0.00%) 8 of 16 (50.00%) 3 (GB) 0 of 1 (0.00%) - 6 of 2 (33.33%) 0 of 3 (0.00%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 2 of 11 (18.18%) 4 (STL) 2 of 3 (66.67%) 0 of 3 (0.00%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 0 of 2 (0.00%) - 2 of 9 (22.22%) 5 (CAR) 1 of 1 (100%) - 3 of 6 (50.00%) 3 of 6 (50.00%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 7 of 14 (50.00%) 6 (NE) 2 of 3 (66.67%) 0 of 2 (0.00%) 1 of 3 (33.33%) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 0 of 2 (0.00%) 4 of 12 (33.33%) 7 (SF) 1 of 1 (100%) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 2 of 6 (33.33%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 0 of 3 (0.00%) 4 of 13 (30.77%) 8 (DET) - 0 of 1 (0.00%) 2 of 4 (50.00%) 1 of 3 (33.33%) 0 of 2 (0.00%) 3 of 10 (30.00%) 9 (MIN) 1 of 3 (33.33%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 1 of 4 (25.00%) 0 of 2 (0.00%) 3 of 12 (25.00%) 10 (NYJ) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 3 of 6 (50.00%) 1 of 4 (25.00%) 2 of 2 (100%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 6 of 14 (42.86%) Total 10 of 16 (62.50%) 7 of 21 (33.33%) 18 of 44 (40.91%) 10 of 29 (34.48%) 1 of 17 (5.88%) 46 of 127 (36.22%) Defense 1 (ARI) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 2 of 5 (40.00%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 4 of 11 (36.36%) 2 (DAL) 1 of 1 (100%) 0 of 2 (0.00%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 3 of 4 (75.00%) 1 of 3 (33.33%) 5 of 11 (45.45%) 3 (GB) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 2 of 3 (66.67%) 5 of 7 (71.43%) 0 of 3 (0.00%) 0 of 3 (0.00%) 10 of 18 (55.56%) 4 (STL) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 0 of 2 (0.00%) 1 of 3 (33.33%) 2 of 3 (66.67%) 3 of 5 (60.00%) 6 of 14 (42.86%) 5 (CAR) - - 2 of 5 (40.00%) 1 of 6 (16.67%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 3 of 12 (27.27%) 6 (NE) 2 of 2 (100%) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 2 of 2 (100%) 3 of 7 (42.86%) 1 of 3 (33.33%) 9 of 16 (56.25%) 7 (SF) - 1 of 2 (50.00%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 2 of 7 (28.57%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 3 of 11 (27.27%) 8 (DET) 3 of 3 (100%) 1 of 1 (100%) 2 of 3 (66.67%) 4 of 6 (66.67%) 1 of 2 (50.00%) 11 of 15 (73.33%) 9 (MIN) - 1 of 1 (100%) 0 of 3 (0.00%) 2 of 6 (33.33%) - 3 of 10 (30.00%) 10 (NYJ) 1 of 3 (33.33%) 0 of 1 (0.00%) 1 of 3 (33.33%) 1 of 5 (20.00%) - 3 of 12 (25.00%) Total 9 of 14 (64.29%) 7 of 16 (43.75%) 13 of 29 (44.83%) 20 of 52 (38.46%) 6 of 19 (31.58%) 57 of 130 (43.85%) The offense’s struggles on third down continue.  Pretty much the only area in which they aren’t below average is in the 7-10 yard range, where they’re perched comfortably above the average team’s successful conversion rate of 28%.  There’s always going to be some small sample bias at work here (it’s damned hard to avoid with football statistics), but with ten weeks in the books we’ve got just enough figures to see that the offense’s percentages are ugly for 3rd down almost across the board. The defense has issues with 3rd down as well, although they’re not as pervasive as the offense’s problems.  They’ve actually been pretty good at stopping teams in 3rd and short and 3rd and medium , but atrocious at keeping teams from converting on 3rd and long.  There’s no good reason for a defense to allow their opponents to convert on 38.46% of their 3rd and 7-10 plays, and allowing them to convert 31.58% of the time on 3rd and 11+ is just indefensible.  A big part of the problem here has been defensive screwups with zone coverage in the short middle zones, but I’m hoping for that to change as Bobby Wagner gains more experience (and particularly after Leroy Hill finally gets replaced by someone with some actual feel for pass defense). Expanded Red Zone Efficiency I’m still crunching and double-checking the numbers here, but I’m liking the results I’m getting after I moved the beginning of the red zone back to the 35 yard line.  As kickers have improved over the years in their field goal percentages, getting to the 20 yard line has been less and less important.  When I’m watching a game, I’m always struck by the disconnect between the announcers talking about the importance of traditional red zone stats, only to turn around and discuss at length how the team currently in possession of the ball needs to make it to at least the 35 yard line in order to have a chance to score.  I’m hoping to have everything done and ready to go for this stat by next week. Penalties   Game Offense Penalized Defense Penalized Special Teams Penalized Penalties/Game 1 (ARI) 7 5 1 13 2 (DAL) 5 0 0 5 3 (GB) 7 6 1 14 4 (STL) 3 2 0 5 5 (CAR) 5 2 0 7 6 (NE) 2 1 1 4 7 (SF) 2 1 0 3 8 (DET) 1 0 1 2 9 (MIN) 2 2 0 4 10 (NYJ) 4 2 1 7 Total 38 21 5 6.4 (17th) Despite a lousy four-penalty performance by the offense last Sunday (none of them committed Breno Giacomini, oddly enough), the Seahawks have managed to claw their way up into the middle of the pack after beginning the season dead last as the most penalized team in the league.  Seeing as how the offense has committed more accepted penalties than the defense and special teams combined, the onus is still very much on them to keep the growth of Seattle’s penalty total to a minimum.
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