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The most successful musical spinoff groups

When one door is closed, there's often another that opens. That's been the case in music over the years. When one band ends, members enjoy success and fame elsewhere, rising from the ashes or going in a different musical direction from their previous stops.

Here's a look at some bands with artists who successfully managed to spin off from other groups.

 
1 of 25

Bell Biv DeVoe

Bell Biv DeVoe
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When Bobby Brown and Ralph Tresvant struck out on their own, the rest of 1980s boy band New Edition — Ricky Bell, Michael Bivins and Ronnie DeVoe — had time on their hands. So why not give it a go as a trio? Thirty years ago this month, BBD released "Poison," a pop, hip-hop gem that offered a more mature sound and attitude from New Edition, and a top five record on the Billboard charts. So let's go back, put on those tank tops, wristbands and dance in the water or on a yacht, whichever is more accessible.

 
2 of 25

Big Audio Dynamite

Big Audio Dynamite
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Following his sacking from the Clash in 1983, guitarist Mick Jones wasn't down long before he formed another successful London-based band. While BAD still had the same punk flair as the Clash, it also incorporated dance, reggae and even some hip-hop into its sound. It really wasn't until 1991's "The Globe," when Jones' group was known as Big Audio Dynamite II, that it earned international success, thanks to the hit "Rush."

 
3 of 25

Bootsy’s Rubber Band

Bootsy’s Rubber Band
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Hall of Fame bassist Bootsy Collins cut his chops playing with James Brown and Parliament-Funkadelic. In the mid-1970s, Collins and others from the latter, toured as Bootsy's Rubber Band. They put out multiple albums, with 1978's "Bootsy? Player of the Year," featuring the smash "Bootzilla," considered one of the great funk projects of all time.

 
4 of 25

The Breeders

The Breeders
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The band originally started as a side project from the Pixies (Kim Deal), along with Tanya Donelly of Throwing Muses, but in 1992 Donelly left the group. One year later, the Pixies broke up and Deal, along with sister Kelley, bassist Josephine Wiggs and drummer Jim MacPherson hit it big with 1993's "Last Splash" - highlighted by the hit "Cannonball."

 
5 of 25

Cracker

Cracker
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Cracker singer David Lowery struck it relatively big following the disbanding of alternative/indie rockers Camper Van Beethoven. Lowery and guitarist Johnny Hickman knocked one out of the park with 1993's "Kerosene Hat," which spawned MTV favorite "Low." However, its self-titled debut album from 1992 should also be considered a staple of the "120 Minutes" era.

 
6 of 25

Crowded House

Crowded House
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New Zealand's Split Enz had its moments during the second half of the 1970s, but members Neil Finn (vocals, guitar) and Paul Hester enjoyed much more success with the formation of Crowded House. The band is best known for its 1986 self-titled debut that featured hits "Don't Dream It's Over" and "Something So Strong." Sadly, Hester committed suicide in 2005, but the band has re-formed and continues playing.

 
7 of 25

ELO

ELO
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British rock band The Move was pretty popular in the United Kingdom during the late 1960s and early '70s, but it's what followed that became a major part of rock history. The Move's Roy Wood, Bev Bevan and Jeff Lynne turned the progressive rock Electric Light Orchestra into one of the prominent bands of the 1970s and eventually Rock & Roll Hall of Famers.

 
8 of 25

Foo Fighters

Foo Fighters
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Following the suicide death of Kurt Cobain and the end of Nirvana, drummer Dave Grohl was not about to sit around and think about what could have been. Instead he essentially created a band of one. He's since added other members (former Nirvana side guitarist Pat Smear and Alanis Morissette drummer Taylor Hawkins to name a couple), and it's become one of the biggest bands in the world. Grohl and Co. will celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Foos' self-titled debut with a tour of some old haunts this year.

 
9 of 25

Fugazi

Fugazi
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When influential straight-edge punk outfit Minor Threat called it quits, vocalist Ian MacKaye eventually got around to forming another trendsetting post-harcore park/experimental band in D.C.-based Fugazi. The band put out six studio albums from 1990-2001, and monster acts like Red Hot Chili Peppers, Bad Religion and Lorde consider it a major influence on their own sounds.

 
10 of 25

Journey

Journey
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After Latin-fused rockers Santana, keyboardist Gregg Rolie and guitarist Neal Schon hit it big with a band that would become Journey. Rolie eventually left the band after former lead singer Steve Perry took a more prominent role in the group, but Journey still remains one of the biggest acts in the world. It's a member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and continues to tour with Schon still branding the ax. 

 
11 of 25

Led Zeppelin

Led Zeppelin
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The end of the Yardbirds opened the door for former session guitarist Jimmy Page to form his new band — one that would set the table for a new, more innovative hard rock, almost heavy metal, kind of sound. Bandmates Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham were not as well known as Page, but together, Led Zeppelin became one of the biggest bands in the world — and one still influencing artists to day. 

 
12 of 25

Little Feat

Little Feat
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After guitarist Lowell George was let go from Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention, he wasn't done with band life. With the help of famed pianist Bill Payne, Little Feat was born. The band enjoyed a strong decade run before its breakup in 1979 and George's subsequent death. Surviving members re-formed the group in the mid 1980s, and it's still delivering that popular band of Southern, country rock. "Dixie Chicken," from 1973, remains the band's signature song.

 
13 of 25

Love and Rockets

Love and Rockets
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Following the end of early 1980s goth-pop band Bauhaus, guitarist/singer Daniel Ash, drummer Kevin Haskins and bass player David J formed Love and Rockets. The latter band had a more pop, alternative rock sound than that of Bauhaus and managed to find success through MTV in the late 1980s and into the 1990s. Interestingly, Bauhaus is back touring in 2020.

 
14 of 25

Megadeth

Megadeth
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When lead guitarist Dave Mustaine was booted from future thrash-rock giant Metallica before the release of its first album, he was determined to prove his old bandmates wrong. In plenty of ways he did. Though Megadeth never reached the commercial success and popularity of the Metallica cooperation, it's considered one of the "Big 4" of thrash, joining Slayer and Anthrax.

 
15 of 25

Mudhoney

Mudhoney
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This was the second go-around for guitarists Mark Arm and Steve Turner, who formed the suburban Seattle-based Green River, which is said to have recorded the first grunge record with its 1985 EP "Come on Down." Turner left Green River, but following the band's demise, he again hooked up with Arm, and the raw, punk-fueled Mudhoney was born and remains one of the most notable Seattle grunge/alternative groups. "Touch Me I'm Sick" is Mudhoney's highlight.

 
16 of 25

New Order

New Order
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Following the suicide of frontman Ian Curtis, surviving Joy Division members Bernard Sumner, Peter Hook and Stephen Morris have enjoyed international success time and time over with New Order. Taking the post-punk sound of Joy Division and adding elements of dance, electronica, techno and synch-pop, New Order, which is touring in 2020, was one of the most innovative and influential bands of the 1980s. 

 
17 of 25

Pearl Jam

Pearl Jam
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Mother Love Bone might have been one of the great bands to come out of the early 1990s Seattle music scene before the death of flamboyant and iconic frontman Andrew Wood. Instead, surviving members Jeff Ament and Stone Gossard, who were also in Green River, pushed forward with a new group called Pearl Jam, which features a frontman in Eddie Vedder, an icon in his own right. The Hall of Famers just released their 11th studio album, "Gigaton," and have sold out a condensed tour through the U.S. and Canada. 

 
18 of 25

Public Image Ltd.

Public Image Ltd.
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When his time with the Sex Pistols was over in the late 1970s, one John "Johnny Rotten" Lydon felt he needed to go a different direction with his music. PIL was more experimental, new wave and really even an early form of alternative music that continues to evolve and turn heads. Lydon, himself, is one of the most iconic frontmen and entertainers of all time.

 
19 of 25

Queens of the Stone Age

Queens of the Stone Age
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Truth be told, Josh Homme has played and founded several bands. Desert-hard rockers Kyuss had a nice run in the late 1980s and well into the 1990s. However, the band essentially transitioned into QOTSA, which remains the most notable and successful of Homme's endeavors. Though it no longer features most of those who played in Kyuss, "Songs for the Deaf" is widely regarded as one of the best hard rock albums of the 2000s.

 
20 of 25

Slaughter

Slaughter
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The Vinnie Vincent Invasion was one of the more underrated pop-metal bands of the 1980s, and its 1988 release, "All Systems Go," shined with Mark Slaughter on vocals. Tensions within the group caused its demise after two albums, but Slaughter struck gold with his self-named band, which included VVI bassist Dana Strum. Slaughter's 1990 debut, "Stick It to Ya," went double-platinum thanks to hits "Up All Night" and "Fly to the Angels."

 
21 of 25

Son Volt

Son Volt
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The first of two prominent bands we'll hear about that rose from the ashes of favorite alternative-country rockers Uncle Tupelo. Started by the multi-talented Jay Farrar, along with fellow Uncle Tupelo bandmate and drummer Mike Heidorn, Son Volt offered a similar alt-country sound as Uncle Tupelo but truly shine thanks to the brilliant songwriting of Farrar.

 
22 of 25

Sugar

Sugar
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Bob Mould did not have much solo success following the breakup of influential Twin Cities punk/alt rockers Hüsker Dü. That changed when he formed Sugar with bassist David Barbe and drummer Malcolm Travis. The band's 1992 debut, "Copper Blue." remains one of the best alternative records of all time and allowed the masses to see what a gifted songwriter/performer Mould is. 

 
23 of 25

Tom Tom Club

Tom Tom Club
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What originally started out as a new-wave side project for Talking Heads couple Tina Weymouth and Chris Frantz, Tom Tom Club is going strong to this day. The group is likely best known to the casual music fan for 1981's catchy "Genius of Love," a song that most of the planet has heard either through its original recording or its use in movies or commercials, but never knew who put it out. 

 
24 of 25

Wilco

Wilco
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While Jay Farrar was doing his thing with Son Volt, Jeff Tweedy and other members of Uncle Tupelo have struck gold as Grammy-winners Wilco. Like Farrar, Tweedy is an exceptional songwriter. And while the band's catalog is quite deliciously extensive and evolving, 2001's "Yankee Hotel Foxtrot" is one of the great indie rock albums of all time. 

 
25 of 25

Wings

Wings
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Honestly, Paul McCartney never intended Wings to be a backing band for his solo work. Some still don't believe that was the case, but former Moody Blues guitarist Denny Laine was quite talented. Wings was a major success for McCartney, and songs like "Band on the Run," "Live and Let Die" and "Jet" can hold their own with many in the Beatles catalog. 

Jeff Mezydlo has written about sports and entertainment online and for print for more than 25 years. He grew up in the far south suburbs of Chicago, 20 minutes from the Mascot Hall of Fame in Whiting, Ind. He’s also the proud father of 11-year-old Matthew, aka “Bobby Bruin,” mascot of St. Robert Bellarmine School in Chicago. You can follow Jeff at @jeffm401.

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