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The best NFL player from every year

Professional football launched in 1920 as the American Professional Football Association (APFA), which became the NFL two years later. One hundred years in, here's a rundown of the best player from every season.

 
1 of 99

2018: Patrick Mahomes, QB, Kansas City Chiefs

2018: Patrick Mahomes, QB, Kansas City Chiefs
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In just his first full season as a starter and second season in the NFL, Mahomes won MVP after leading the league with 50 touchdowns and an 82.0 QBR. The Chiefs quarterback also had 5,097 yards passing, leading the most prolific offense in the NFL.

 
2 of 99

2017: Tom Brady, QB, New England Patriots

2017: Tom Brady, QB, New England Patriots
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Age was no obstacle for Brady, won who his third MVP Award at age 40. The Patriots signal-caller led the NFL with 4,577 yards passing and also had 32/8 TD/INT, leading the team to a 13-3 regular-season record.

 
3 of 99

2016: Matt Ryan, QB, Atlanta Falcons

2016: Matt Ryan, QB, Atlanta Falcons
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Ryan had a breakout season, leading the elite Falcons offense with 4,944 yards passing and 38 touchdowns. His 9.3 yards per pass attempt led the league, but the Falcons memorably blew a 28-3 lead to the Patriots in the Super Bowl.

 
4 of 99

2015: Cam Newton, QB, Carolina Panthers

2015: Cam Newton, QB, Carolina Panthers
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Carolina's versatile quarterback won the 2015 MVP after leading the team to a 15-1 regular-season record. He threw 35 touchdowns and also ran fro 10 more scores during the year. Newton eventually led the Panthers to the Super Bowl, but the team lost to the Broncos.

 
5 of 99

2014: Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay Packers

2014: Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay Packers
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Coming off an injury-shortened 2013 season, Rodgers won the MVP Award with a huge offensive campaign. He threw for 4,381 yards and 38 touchdowns while getting picked off only five times. Green Bay went 12-4 during the regular season but eventually lost to Seattle in the NFC championship game.

 
6 of 99

2013: Peyton Manning, QB, Denver Broncos

2013: Peyton Manning, QB, Denver Broncos
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Manning put together one of the greatest offensive seasons by a quarterback in history, leading the league with 5,477 yards and 55 touchdowns en route to his fifth MVP Award. He led the Broncos to a 13-3 regular-season record for the second consecutive season, but the team was blown out by Seattle in the Super Bowl.

 
7 of 99

2012: Adrian Peterson, RB, Minnesota Vikings

2012: Adrian Peterson, RB, Minnesota Vikings
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Peterson not only made an incredibly quick return from a major knee injury in 2012, but he also reached the vaunted 2,000 yards rushing milestone. He easily led the league with 2,097 yards rushing and 2,314 yards from scrimmage to win league MVP.

 
8 of 99

2011: Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay Packers

2011: Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay Packers
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Rodgers won his first NFL MVP in his fourth season as a starter, leading the Packers to a 14-1 regular-season record in his 15 starts. He threw for 4,643 yards and 45 touchdowns vs. only six interceptions. Unfortunately, Green Bay was upset by the Giants in the divisional round of the playoffs.

 
9 of 99

2010: Tom Brady, QB, New England Patriots

2010: Tom Brady, QB, New England Patriots
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Brady had an incredibly efficient 2010 season, with a league-leading 36 touchdown passes and only four interceptions over 16 starts. He also led the league with 9.0 yards per pass attempt to win MVP.

 
10 of 99

2009: Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis Colts

2009: Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis Colts
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Manning won his third MVP Award with Indianapolis in 2009, throwing for 4,500 yards and 33 touchdowns in a 14-2 regular season. He led the Colts to the Super Bowl, where they were upset by the Saints.

 
11 of 99

2008: Drew Brees, QB, New Orleans Saints

2008: Drew Brees, QB, New Orleans Saints
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Peyton Manning was the 2008 MVP Award winner, but Brees had superior stats while leading the 8-8 Saints. He led the league with 5,069 yards passing and 34 touchdowns, making his third Pro Bowl.

 
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2007: Tom Brady, QB, New England Patriots

2007: Tom Brady, QB, New England Patriots
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After missing nearly all of the 2006 season due to a knee injury, Brady made up for lost time with a historic 2007 campaign. He led the Patriots to a perfect 16-0 regular season after leading the league with 4,806 yards passing, 50 touchdowns and a 68.6 completion rate. The Patriots were upset by the Giants in the Super Bowl, halting their quest for a perfect year.

 
13 of 99

2006: LaDainian Tomlinson, RB, San Diego Chargers

2006: LaDainian Tomlinson, RB, San Diego Chargers
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Tomlinson led the NFL in rushing yards and rushing touchdowns, putting together one of the best years ever by a running back with 1,815 yards on the ground and 28 rushing scores. He won NFL MVP for the 14-2 Chargers.

 
14 of 99

2005: Shaun Alexander, RB, Seattle Seahawks

2005: Shaun Alexander, RB, Seattle Seahawks
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Alexander had his fifth straight season with at least 1,100 rushing yards, and this one was clearly his best. The Seahawks star won NFL MVP by leading the league with 1,880 rushing yards and 27 rushing touchdowns. He would start to break down physically the following year.

 
15 of 99

2004: Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis Colts

2004: Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis Colts
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Manning had one of the most productive seasons in NFL history by a quarterback in 2004, leading the NFL with 49 touchdown passes while adding 4,557 yards passing. He also led the league with 9.2 yards per pass attempt in a 12-4 regular season.

 
16 of 99

2003: Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis Colts

2003: Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis Colts
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Manning won his first of five career MVP Awards in 2003, sharing the honor with Steve McNair. He led the NFL with 4,267 yards passing and a 67.0 percent completion rate. He added 29 touchdowns passes in the Colts' 12-4 regular season.

 
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2002: Priest Holmes, RB, Kansas City Chiefs

2002: Priest Holmes, RB, Kansas City Chiefs
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Rich Gannon of the rival Raiders won NFL MVP in 2002, but Holmes managed to win Offensive Player of the Year after his tremendous campaign. Playing only 14 games, Holmes had 1,615 yards rushing and led the league with 2,287 yards from scrimmage and 24 total touchdowns.

 
18 of 99

2001: Kurt Warner, QB, St. Louis Rams

2001: Kurt Warner, QB, St. Louis Rams
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Warner's amazing three-year run culminated with a 14-2 regular season record in 2001 in which he led the NFL in passing yards (4,830), passing touchdowns (36) and completion rate 68.7 percent). He was able to win his second MVP, but the Rams were upset by the Patriots in the Super Bowl.

 
19 of 99

2000: Marshall Faulk, RB, St. Louis Rams

2000: Marshall Faulk, RB, St. Louis Rams
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With Kurt Warner missing five games, Faulk was able to step up and win MVP for the league's premier offense. Over 14 regular-season games, Faulk led the league with 26 touchdowns and also had 2,189 yards from scrimmage.

 
20 of 99

1999: Marshall Faulk, RB, St. Louis Rams

1999: Marshall Faulk, RB, St. Louis Rams
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Faulk was traded from the Colts to the Rams prior to the 1999 season and helped spark the arrival of the Greatest Show on Turf in St. Louis along with quarterback Kurt Warner. While Warner won NFL MVP, Faulk was arguably more deserving with a league-leading 2,429 yards from scrimmage and 12 touchdowns. He also led the league with 5.5 yards per carry.

 
21 of 99

1998: Terrell Davis, RB, Denver Broncos

1998: Terrell Davis, RB, Denver Broncos
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Davis peaked in 1998 with an MVP campaign, rushing for more than 2,000 yards and 21 touchdowns. The Broncos back also led the NFL with 5.1 yards per carry.

 
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1997: Barry Sanders, RB, Detroit Lions

1997: Barry Sanders, RB, Detroit Lions
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Sanders was a co-MVP with Packers quarterback Brett Favre in 1997, surpassing 2,000 yards rushing and averaging a staggering 6.1 yards per carry. The all-time great would play only one more season before calling it a career following the 1998 season.

 
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1996: Brett Favre, QB, Green Bay Packers

1996: Brett Favre, QB, Green Bay Packers
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Favre won his second consecutive MVP Award, leading the league with 39 touchdown passes while going 13-3 during the regular season. Green Bay won the Super Bowl over New England and had the top offense in the league.

 
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1995: Brett Favre, QB, Green Bay Packers

1995: Brett Favre, QB, Green Bay Packers
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Favre won his first of three MVP Awards, leading the league with 4,413 passing yards and 38 touchdowns. Green Bay finished 11-5 during the regular season but lost to the Cowboys in the NFC conference championship.

 
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1994: Steve Young, QB, San Francisco 49ers

1994: Steve Young, QB, San Francisco 49ers
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Young won his second MVP Award in three years, completing more than 70 percent of his passes and leading the league with 35 touchdown passes. The 49ers easily won the Super Bowl due in large part to their dominant offense led by Young.

 
26 of 99

1993: Steve Young, QB, San Francisco 49ers

1993: Steve Young, QB, San Francisco 49ers
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Young lost out on his second straight MVP due to Emmitt Smith's great season, but the star quarterback had another terrific year. He threw for more than 4,000 yards and led the league with 29 touchdown passes and 8.7 yards per pass attempt.

 
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1992: Steve Young, QB, San Francisco 49ers

1992: Steve Young, QB, San Francisco 49ers
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Young won the MVP in his first 16-game season as the 49ers starter, leading the league with a 66.7 percent competition rate and 25 passing touchdowns. The lefty's 8.6 yards per pass attempt was also tops in the league.

 
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1991: Thurman Thomas, RB, Buffalo Bills

1991: Thurman Thomas, RB, Buffalo Bills
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Thomas was the first running back since Marcus Allen in 1985 to win NFL MVP, rushing for 1,407 yards and nine scores while leading the league with 4.9 yards per carry. He also had more than 2,000 yards from scrimmage.

 
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1990: Warren Moon, QB, Houston Oilers

1990: Warren Moon, QB, Houston Oilers
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Joe Montana won NFL MVP in 1990, but Moon had superior stats for the Oilers. Starting 15 games, he led the league with 4,689 passing yards and 33 touchdowns, averaging 8.0 yards per pass attempt.

 
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1989: Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco 49ers

1989: Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco 49ers
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Montana won his first NFL MVP Award with arguably his finest season in 1989, completing 70.2 percent of his passes with 3,521 yards and 26 touchdowns. He easily led the NFL with 9.1 passing yards per attempt.

 
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1988: Boomer Esiason, QB, Cincinnati Bengals

1988: Boomer Esiason, QB, Cincinnati Bengals
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Esiason had his best season in 1988, winning NFL MVP with 3,572 yards passing and 28 touchdowns. He led the league in yards per passing attempt for the second time in three years, as the Bengals advanced to the Super Bowl.

 
32 of 99

1987: Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco 49ers

1987: Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco 49ers
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Broncos quarterback John Elway won the NFL MVP, but Montana was arguably better with a league-leading 31 touchdown passes and 66.8 completion rate for the top offense in the NFL.

 
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1986: Dan Marino, QB, Miami Dolphins

1986: Dan Marino, QB, Miami Dolphins
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Giants linebacker Lawrence Taylor won NFL MVP with 20.5 sacks, but Marino was the NFL's most dominant offensive player. He led the league with 4,746 yards passing and 44 touchdowns, nearly matching his epic 1984 season.

 
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1985: Marcus Allen, RB, Los Angeles Raiders

1985: Marcus Allen, RB, Los Angeles Raiders
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Allen was the first running back since Earl Campbell six years earlier to win NFL MVP, leading the league with 1,759 yards rushing and 2,314 yards from scrimmage. He had 14 total touchdowns as the Raiders went 12-4 during the regular season.

 
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1984: Dan Marino, QB, Miami Dolphins

1984: Dan Marino, QB, Miami Dolphins
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Marino burst onto the scene with one of the best seasons ever by a quarterback, leading the league with 5,084 yards passing and 48 touchdowns and 9.0 yards per pass attempt. Miami went 14-2 during the regular season but fell to the 49ers in the Super Bowl.

 
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1983: Joe Theismann, QB, Washington Redskins

1983: Joe Theismann, QB, Washington Redskins
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Theisman had his best season at age 34, throwing for 3,714 yards and 29 touchdowns in a 14-2 regular season. He led Washington to the Super Bowl, where it lost to the Raiders.

 
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1982: Dan Fouts, QB, San Diego Chargers

1982: Dan Fouts, QB, San Diego Chargers
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Fouts won the MVP in a strike-shortened 1982 season, throwing for 2,883 yards and 17 touchdowns in only nine games. He also led the league with 8.7 yards per pass attempt.

 
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1981: Ken Anderson, QB, Cincinnati Bengals

1981: Ken Anderson, QB, Cincinnati Bengals
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Anderson won the 1981 MVP, throwing for 3,754 yards and 29 touchdowns as he led Cincinnati to a 12-4 regular season record. The Bengals lost to San Francisco in the Super Bowl.

 
39 of 99

1980: Brian Sipe, QB, Cleveland Browns

1980: Brian Sipe, QB, Cleveland Browns
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Sipe led the NFL in touchdown passes in 1979, but he was even better as the league MVP in 1980. He threw for 4,132 yards and 30 touchdowns while being picked off 14 times. The Browns went 11-5 during the regular season but lost to the Raiders in the divisional round of the playoffs.

 
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1979: Earl Campbell, RB, Houston Oilers

1979: Earl Campbell, RB, Houston Oilers
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Campbell won his second consecutive MVP Award in 1979, rushing for a league-leading 1,697 yards and 19 touchdowns in his sophomore season. Houston advanced to the AFC conference championship after going 11-5 during the regular season.

 
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1978: Terry Bradshaw, QB, Pittsburgh Steelers

1978: Terry Bradshaw, QB, Pittsburgh Steelers
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Rookie running back Earl Campbell won the MVP, but Bradshaw had arguably his finest season as the Steelers went 14-2 and won the Super Bowl. He threw for 2,915 yards and a league-high 28 touchdowns while averaging 7.9 yards per pass attempt.

 
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1977: Walter Payton, RB, Chicago Bears

1977: Walter Payton, RB, Chicago Bears
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The busiest back in the NFL with 339 carries, Payton also led the league with 1,852 rushing yards and 14 scores to earn the league MVP.

 
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1976: Bert Jones, QB, Baltimore Colts

1976: Bert Jones, QB, Baltimore Colts
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With only his second season as a full-time starter, Jones won MVP for the Colts after leading the league with 3,104 yards passing in 14 games and adding 24 touchdowns. Baltimore went 11-3 during the regular season but fell to Pittsburgh in the playoffs.

 
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1975: Fran Tarkenton, QB, Minnesota Vikings

1975: Fran Tarkenton, QB, Minnesota Vikings
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Tarkenton won MVP, leading the NFL with 25 touchdowns passes and falling just short of 3,000 yards passing in a 12-2 regular season. The Vikings were quickly ousted in the playoffs by the Cowboys, however.

 
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1974: Ken Stabler, QB, Oakland Raiders

1974: Ken Stabler, QB, Oakland Raiders
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Stabler had his only All-Pro season in 1974, leading the league with 26 touchdowns while throwing for 2,469 yards in 14 games. The Raiders averaged a league-leading 25.4 points per game.

 
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1973: O.J. Simpson, RB, Buffalo Bills

1973: O.J. Simpson, RB, Buffalo Bills
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Simpson became the NFL's first 2,000-yard rusher in 1973, averaging 143.1 yards per game and adding 12 rushing touchdowns. Buffalo went 9-5 during the regular season but failed to make the playoffs.

 
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1972: Larry Brown, RB, Washington Redskins

1972: Larry Brown, RB, Washington Redskins
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Brown was the AP Offensive Player of the Year with 1,216 rushing yards in only 12 games, leading the league with 101.3 yards rushing per game. He also led the league with 1,689 yards from scrimmage.

 
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1971: Bob Griese, QB, Miami Dolphins

1971: Bob Griese, QB, Miami Dolphins
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Griese had a brilliant season for the Dolphins with 2,089 yards passing and 19 touchdowns for his first of two All-Pro seasons in 1971. Miami would go on to have a perfect season the following year, though Griese had his season cut short due to injury.

 
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1970: John Brodie, QB, San Francisco 49ers

1970: John Brodie, QB, San Francisco 49ers
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Brodie was the MVP in 1970, leading the NFL with 2,941 yards passing and 24 touchdowns. The 35-year-old quarterback led San Francisco to a 10-3-1 regular season before the Niners fell to Dallas in the NFC championship game.

 
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1969: Roman Gabriel, QB, Los Angeles Rams

1969: Roman Gabriel, QB, Los Angeles Rams
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Gabriel continued his elite play for the Rams in 1969, winning the MVP after throwing for 2,459 yards and a league-high 24 touchdowns. He also throw only seven interceptions in 399 attempts.

 
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1968: Earl Morrall, QB, Baltimore Colts

1968: Earl Morrall, QB, Baltimore Colts
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Morrall replaced the injured Johnny Unitas in 1968 and was the Colts savior with 2,909 yards passing and a league-leading 26 touchdown passes in a 13-1 regular season. Baltimore would eventually be upset by the Jets in the Super Bowl.

 
52 of 99

1967: Johnny Unitas, QB, Baltimore Colts

1967: Johnny Unitas, QB, Baltimore Colts
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Unitas won the MVP at age 34 after leading Baltimore to an 11-1-2 regular season. He led the NFL with a 58.5 completion rate and threw for 3,428 yards and 20 touchdowns.

 
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1966: Bart Starr, QB, Green Bay Packers

1966: Bart Starr, QB, Green Bay Packers
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Starr won his only MVP Award, in 1966, with a highly efficient season in which he led the Packers to an 11-2 regular season over his 13 starts. He completed 62.2 percent of his passes for 2,257 yards and 14 touchdowns while being picked off only three times.

 
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1965: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns

1965: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns
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Brown called it quits after the 1965 season, which was his third MVP campaign. The Browns running back led the league with 1,544 yards rushing and 17 rushing touchdowns.

 
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1964: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns

1964: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns
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Colts running back Lenny Moore won the MVP, but Brown was more productive with a league-leading 1,446 yards rushing, seven rushing scores and 5.2 yards per carry.

 
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1963: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns

1963: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns
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Brown had perhaps his best season in 1963, leading the NFL with 1,863 yards rushing, 12 rushing touchdowns and 6.4 yards per carry. It was his sixth time leading the league in rushing over seven seasons.

 
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1962: Jim Taylor, FB, Green Bay Packers

1962: Jim Taylor, FB, Green Bay Packers
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Taylor won the MVP after leading the NFL with 1,474 rushing yards and 19 rushing touchdowns in 14 games. He helped the Packers average 29.6 points per game and go 13-1 during the regular season.

 
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1961: Sonny Jurgensen, QB, Philadelphia Eagles

1961: Sonny Jurgensen, QB, Philadelphia Eagles
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Y.A. Tittle won the MVP in 1961, but Jurgensen had bigger numbers, leading the NFL with 3,723 yards passing and 32 touchdowns in his first year as a regular starter. The Eagles went 10-4 during the regular season.

 
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1960: Norm Van Brocklin, QB, Philadelphia Eagles

1960: Norm Van Brocklin, QB, Philadelphia Eagles
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Van Brocklin won his only MVP in his first NFL season, throwing for 2,471 yards and 24 touchdowns in 12 games. He led five fourth-quarter comebacks during the season.

 
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1959: Johnny Unitas, QB, Baltimore Colts

1959: Johnny Unitas, QB, Baltimore Colts
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Unitias won his first NFL MVP from the UPI, leading the NFL with 2,899 yards passing and 32 touchdowns in a 9-3 regular season. He led the Colts to a championship win over the Giants.

 
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1958: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns

1958: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns
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Brown won his first MVP Award after leading the NFL with 1,527 yards rushing and 17 rushing touchdowns at age 22. The Browns went 9-3 during the regular season, averaging 25.2 points per game.

 
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1957: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns

1957: Jim Brown, RB, Cleveland Browns
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Brown took the league by storm in his rookie season with a league-leading 942 yards rushing and nine touchdowns. Cleveland went 9-2-1 during the regular season.

 
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1956: Frank Gifford, RB, New York Giants

1956: Frank Gifford, RB, New York Giants
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Gifford was the league MVP with a career-high 819 yards rushing and league-leading 1,422 yards from scrimmage in 1956. He helped New York go 8-3-1 during the regular season.

 
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1955: Otto Graham, QB, Cleveland Browns

1955: Otto Graham, QB, Cleveland Browns
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Graham won his third UPI MVP Award in his final season. The Browns quarterback threw for 1,721 yards and 15 touchdowns over 12 regular-season games, and Cleveland eventually won the championship game over the Rams.

 
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1954: Norm Van Brocklin, QB, Los Angeles Rams

1954: Norm Van Brocklin, QB, Los Angeles Rams
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Van Brocklin averaged a league-high 10.1 yards per pass attempt and 2,637 total yards passing in his terrific 1954 season for the Rams.

 
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1953: Otto Graham, QB, Cleveland Browns

1953: Otto Graham, QB, Cleveland Browns
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Graham won his second MVP Award in 1953, throwing for a league-high 2,722 yards and averaging 10.6 yards per completion.  Cleveland went 10-1 in his 11 regular-season starts, but the Browns lost to Detroit in the championship game.

 
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1952: Dan Towler, FB, Los Angeles Rams

1952: Dan Towler, FB, Los Angeles Rams
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Towler had a great season as the league's leading rusher with 894 yards and also led the NFL with 10 rushing touchdowns. Los Angeles lost to Detroit in the playoffs.

 
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1951: Otto Graham, QB, Cleveland Browns

1951: Otto Graham, QB, Cleveland Browns
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Graham won his first MVP Award in 1951, as he threw for 2,205 yards and 17 touchdowns. Cleveland lost the championship game to the Los Angeles Rams.

 
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1950: Norm Van Brocklin, QB, Los Angeles Rams

1950: Norm Van Brocklin, QB, Los Angeles Rams
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Van Brocklin led the Rams at quarterback with 2,061 yards passing and 18 touchdowns in only his second NFL season. L.A. lost to the Browns in the championship.

 
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1949: Steve Van Buren, HB, Philadelphia Eagles

1949: Steve Van Buren, HB, Philadelphia Eagles
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Van Buren led the NFL in rushing for the third consecutive season, finishing with 1,146 yards and 11 rushing touchdowns in 12 games. Philadelphia averaged more than 30 points per game and won the championship.

 
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1948: Steve Van Buren, HB, Philadelphia Eagles

1948: Steve Van Buren, HB, Philadelphia Eagles
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Averaging nearly 86 yards rushing per game, Van Buren led the league with 945 yards rushing and 10 rushing touchdowns. Philly's offense averaged 31.3 points per game and won the championship.

 
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1947: Sammy Baugh, QB, Washington Redskins

1947: Sammy Baugh, QB, Washington Redskins
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Baugh's Redskins went only 4-8 during the regular season, but he led the league with 2,938 yards passing and 25 passing touchdowns. His 4.2 percent interception rate was also the best in the league.

 
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1946: Sid Luckman, QB, Chicago Bears

1946: Sid Luckman, QB, Chicago Bears
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Luckman led the NFL champion Bears at quarterback, leading the league with 1,826 yards passing and 17 touchdown passes.

 
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1945: Bob Waterfield, QB, Cleveland Rams

1945: Bob Waterfield, QB, Cleveland Rams
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Waterfield led the NFL in touchdown passes (14) and yards per pass attempt (9.4) in his rookie season, as the Rams went 9-1 and won the championship. He also won the Joe F. Carr Trophy as the league MVP.

 
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1944: Frank Sinkwich, HB, Detroit Lions

1944: Frank Sinkwich, HB, Detroit Lions
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The 1942 Heisman Trophy winner at Georgia, Sinkwich was the 1944 NFL MVP after rushing for 563 yards and six touchdowns.

 
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1943: Sid Luckman, QB, Chicago Bears

1943: Sid Luckman, QB, Chicago Bears
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Luckman led the NFL with 2,194 yards passing and 28 passing touchdowns, averaging 10.9 yards per attempt. The Bears won the championship after a great 8-1-1 regular season.

 
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1942: Don Hutson, End, Green Bay Packers

1942: Don Hutson, End, Green Bay Packers
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Hutson had a career year in 1942, leading the NFL with 74 receptions for 1,211 yards and 17 receiving touchdowns. He also successfully kicked 33 extra points and had seven interceptions at safety.

 
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1941: Don Hutson, End, Green Bay Packers

1941: Don Hutson, End, Green Bay Packers
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Green Bay's star end led the NFL with 58 receptions for 738 yards and 10 receiving touchdowns. He also led the league with 20 extra points made.

 
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1940: Sammy Baugh, TB, Washington Redskins

1940: Sammy Baugh, TB, Washington Redskins
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Baugh led Washington to a 9-2 regular-season record, leading the NFL with 1,367 yards passing and 12 touchdowns. He completed 62.7 percent of his passes.

 
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1939: Parker Hall, QB/HB, Cleveland Rams

1939: Parker Hall, QB/HB, Cleveland Rams
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Hall led the NFL in passes and touchdown rate during his rookie season, completing 51 percent of his passes for 1,227 yards and nine touchdowns. He also ran for 458 yards and two scores. He won MVP after becoming the first player in league history to complete more than 100 passes in a season.

 
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1938: Don Hutson, End, Green Bay Packers

1938: Don Hutson, End, Green Bay Packers
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Hutson was an All-Pro for the first time in 1938, leading the league with 548 receiving yards and nine receiving touchdowns.

 
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1937: Cliff Battles, TB, Washington Redskins

1937: Cliff Battles, TB, Washington Redskins
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Battles played his final NFL season in 1937, leading the league with 216 carries for 874 yards and five rushing touchdowns. Washington went 8-3 during the regular season and won the championship.

 
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1936: Arnie Herber, TB, Green Bay Packers

1936: Arnie Herber, TB, Green Bay Packers
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Herber led the NFL in passing touchdowns for the third time in 1937, with 11, and added a league-high 1,239 yards passing. The Green Bay native led the team to a 10-1-1 regular season record and championship win.

 
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1935: Dutch Clark, TB, Detroit Lions

1935: Dutch Clark, TB, Detroit Lions
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Clark led the NFL in points scored in 1935, with six touchdowns, two touchdown passes and 16 extra points made. The Lions won the championship after a 7-3-2 regular season.

 
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1934: Dutch Clark, QB, Detroit Lions

1934: Dutch Clark, QB, Detroit Lions
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Clark led the NFL with eight rushing touchdowns and also kicked 13 extra points during Detroit's 10-3 regular season. He was selected as a first-time All-Pro at quarterback.

 
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1933: Jim Musick, FB, Boston Redskins

1933: Jim Musick, FB, Boston Redskins
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Musick had a fantastic 1933 season, leading the NFL with 809 yards rushing and 67.4 yards per game to make the NFL All-Star team.

 
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1932: Arnie Herber, TB, Green Bay Packers

1932: Arnie Herber, TB, Green Bay Packers
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Herber had one of his best seasons in a Hall of Fame career, throwing for a league-high 639 yards and nine scores. He also ran for 149 yards in a 10-3-1 regular season.

 
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1931: Johnny McNally, TB, Green Bay Packers

1931: Johnny McNally, TB, Green Bay Packers
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Johnny "Blood" McNally led the Packers to their third straight championship, scoring 14 touchdowns. Green Bay went 12-2 during the regular season.

 
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1930: Verne Lewellen, TB, Green Bay Packers

1930: Verne Lewellen, TB, Green Bay Packers
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The Packers won their second consecutive championship, as Lewellen scored nine touchdowns. Green Bay went 10-3-1 for the season.

 
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1929: Ernie Nevers, FB, Chicago Cardinals

1929: Ernie Nevers, FB, Chicago Cardinals
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After taking a year off from the NFL in 1928, Nevers returned to be the league's top fullback with 12 touchdowns and added 10 extra points.

 
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1928: Benny Friedman, TB, Detroit Wolverines

1928: Benny Friedman, TB, Detroit Wolverines
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Friedman led the best offense in the NFL in 1928, throwing 10 touchdown passes and also leading the league in rushing touchdowns. The Wolverines went 7-2-1 for the season.

 
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1927: Jack McBride, FB, New York Giants

1927: Jack McBride, FB, New York Giants
Bettmann / Getty Images

McBride led the NFL in scoring during the 1927 season, his third in the league. He kicked 15 extra points and scored six touchdowns.

 
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1926: Barney Wentz, FB, Pottsville Maroons

1926: Barney Wentz, FB, Pottsville Maroons
Underwood Archives / Getty Images

Wentz scored a league-high 10 touchdowns in 1926, as the Maroons went 10-2. He was named an All-Pro.

 
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1925: Charlie Berry, LE, Pottsville Maroons

1925: Charlie Berry, LE, Pottsville Maroons
Bettmann / Getty Images

Berry played in both the NFL and MLB. His NFL rookie season in 1925 saw him lead the league with 74 points scored, including six touchdowns and 29 extra points.

 
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1924: Tex Hamer, FB, Frankford Yellow Jackets

1924: Tex Hamer, FB, Frankford Yellow Jackets
Wikimedia Commons

Hamer scored 12 touchdowns for the Yellow Jackets in 1924 and was named First Team All-NFL with 72 total points scored.

 
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1923: John Leo Driscoll, LH, Chicago Cardinals

1923: John Leo Driscoll, LH, Chicago Cardinals
Bettmann / Getty Images

Driscoll played in both MLB and the NFL and scored 78 points for the Chicago Cardinals in 1923. He was the league's leading scorer, even though he appeared in only eight of 12 games.

 
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1922: Guy Chamberlin, LE, Canton Bulldogs

1922: Guy Chamberlin, LE, Canton Bulldogs
Bettmann / Getty Images

Chamberlin served as both a player and head coach of the Bulldogs, as the team went 10-0-2. He scored seven touchdowns, leading the league in points.

 
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1921: Elmer Oliphant, WB, Buffalo All-Americans

1921: Elmer Oliphant, WB, Buffalo All-Americans
George Rinhart / Corbis Historical / Getty Images

Oliphant led the league in points scored after throwing seven touchdowns and also kicking five field goals and 26 extra points. Buffalo went 9-1-2 with Oliphant starring in 1921.

 
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1920: Fritz Pollard, TB, Akron Pros

1920: Fritz Pollard, TB, Akron Pros
B Bennett / Getty Images

Pollard was one of only two African American players in 1920. He led the team that won the first APFA championship.

Seth Trachtman is a fantasy sports expert and diehard Kansas City Chiefs fan still hoping for a Super Bowl win during his lifetime. He doesn't often Tweet, but when he does, you can find him on Twitter @sethroto.



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