Originally posted on Bronx Pinstripes  |  Last updated 4/9/13
They say Baseball is a game of adjustments. You have to constantly adjust because your opponent is doing the same thing, almost like a cat and mouse game. For a few seasons, Vernon Wells lost himself – getting away from the player that earned a seven-year $126 million contract with Toronto. Seemingly in a downward spiral, Wells was relegated to the fifth outfield spot on the Angels coming into this season, where he would play out his contract and retire after the ’14 season. From 2002 when he became an everyday player, up until 2010 – his last year with Toronto – Wells averaged 25 homers and 89 RBIs while hitting .279. In his two seasons with LA, he averaged 18 homers, 48 RBIs and a weak .222 avg. Coming into 2013 at the age of 34, Wells decided a change was necessary. He had become so pull-conscious and homer-happy, his swing was out of whack. He had become a feast or famine type guy, who almost always pulled the ball. According to an article written by Dave D’Alessandro of the Newark Star Ledger, Wells was quoted as saying: “It’s not about power numbers — it’s about my swing… It’s about being a good hitter and homers coming off that.” Wells then looked at a lot of tape of himself, even going back to when he was a 20 year-old in 1999. “The reason I slipped was glaring: It was my point of contact. It was so far out in front of me, the only thing I could do was pull the ball and roll over them,” Wells said in the story. Wells has closed his stance a bit, moved closer to the plate and is more balanced and low, which enables him to hit balls the opposite way. By noticing his point of contact was out in front of him, he is now letting the ball travel deep into the zone.  The improvement was seen in Spring Training, as he hit .333 with 4 homers and 12 RBIs in 17 games. The success has spilled over into the regular season; coming into tonight’s game with Cleveland, Wells is hitting .381 with 2 homers, 4 RBIs and a .500 OBP. In Yesterday’s win over the Indians, Wells had three hits – all of them going to right field. Last year, he accumulated 3 hits ALL season the other way. Usually you’ll hear hitting coaches say that when a guy is going the other way with pitches, he is locked in and seeing the ball really well. Wells’ patience has also improved. Last year in 262 PA’s, Wells walked only 16 times. So far already with the Yankees,  in  26 plate appearances, he has walked five times – a much better pace. This means he is seeing the ball clearly, and not chasing out of the zone. Although his current pace is most likely unsustainable over the course of a full season, the Yankees are benefiting from Wells’ adjustments. It is a small sample size to judge a player on (7 games) but the quickness in his bat is evident. To illustrate just how different Wells’ approach is, here is a picture comparing his stance from 2010 (.273, 33 homers, 88 RBIs with TOR) 2012 (.230, 11 homers, 29 RBIs with LA) and this season with the Yankees. Wells has gone back to what made him successful in Toronto. For the Yankees and their fans, they hope the results continue. Photo courtesy of twitter: @YankeeSource
GET THE YARDBARKER APP:
Ios_download En_app_rgb_wo_45
MORE FROM YARDBARKER

Indians reveal Frank Robinson statue at Progressive Field

Report: Jerry West considered rejoining the Lakers before they hired Magic Johnson

The NHL is thinking about hosting an outdoor game in Nashville

Michael Vick in talks to retire with Falcons

Hall of Fame pitcher and former U.S. Senator Jim Bunning passes away at 85

LIKE WHAT YOU SEE?
GET THE DAILY NEWSLETTER:

Roger Goodell to speak at Rams event, tickets start at $550

Ohio State hails itself as the ‘fastest team in college football’

Get a look at Shia LeBeouf as John McEnroe in Borg/McEnroe movie trailer

Draymond Green is the most efficient defender in the NBA

It’s not even June, but the San Francisco Giants are probably screwed

Odell Beckham Jr. appears to take shot at Ben McAdoo

Best of Yardbarker: Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines

The 'More like Whiffer, Texas Ranger...amirite?' quiz

The Rewind: Vince Carter's graduation day celebration that wasn't

Manu Ginobili gave life to the San Antonio Spurs

Stanley Cup Final: A David vs. Goliath matchup that's not as lopsided as it may appear

Why the Indianapolis 500 is called 'the greatest spectacle in racing'

The 10 best sports docs available for streaming

Box Score 5/26: Bring on the Finals

Why wait? Our too soon Cavaliers-Warriors NBA Finals preview

Kicking It: East is East, and West is West

Three Up, Three Down: Some surprises way out (NL) West

The 'Let's go to the videotape!' quiz

All Sports News
Delivered to your inbox
You'll also receive Yardbarker's daily Top 10, featuring the best sports stories from around the web. Customize your newsletter to get articles on your favorite sports and teams. And the best part? It's free!

By clicking "Sign Me Up", you have read and agreed to the Fox Sports Digital Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. You can opt out at any time. For more information, please see our Privacy Policy.
the YARDBARKER app
Get it now!
Ios_download En_app_rgb_wo_45

Best of Yardbarker: Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines

The 'More like Whiffer, Texas Ranger...amirite?' quiz

Stanley Cup Final: A David vs. Goliath matchup that's not as lopsided as it may appear

Manu Ginobili gave life to the San Antonio Spurs

The Rewind: Vince Carter's graduation day celebration that wasn't

The 10 best sports docs available for streaming

Kicking It: East is East, and West is West

Three Up, Three Down: Some surprises way out (NL) West

The 'Let's go to the videotape!' quiz

Why the Indianapolis 500 is called 'the greatest spectacle in racing'

Today's Best Stuff
For Publishers
Company Info
Help
Follow Yardbarker