Originally posted on Fox Sports North  |  Last updated 1/27/12
Love84034369
MINNEAPOLIS -- With eight healthy players, all aching from too many minutes and too few days off, the Minnesota Timberwolves resorted to what looked like a space-age solution Tuesday night in Dallas. Giant metal tanks and puffs of chemical steam, gloves and socks and hazard labels - this was supposed to be the cure? Several Timberwolves tweeted pictures of teammates undergoing a treatment called cryotherapy, in which they spent 3 minutes standing in what appears to be a misty metal vat. The treatment is one of the newest crazes in pain management among athletes, and it has similar effects to that of an ice bath. In the spirit of this season, a year when what should be a week of games is compressed into four or five days, players like rookie forward Derrick Williams enjoy cryotherapy for its speedy results. After stripping down to only a bathing suit or shorts, gloves and socks, players enter the chamber and experience four blasts of nitrous oxide, which creates the steam or mist that seems to rise from the chamber. Three minutes of temperatures as low as minus-166 degrees Fahrenheit, and it's over. "The 3 minutes, that's all you've got to look forward to," Derrick Williams said. "An ice bath is 15 to 20 minutes. No one wants to sit in there that long." Kevin Love and Williams said at Friday's shootaround that their chambers were set to about minus-150 degrees Fahrenheit, and both players cringed as they remembered the cold. Williams, who's had the treatment several times before, said it's something he looks forward to but more for the effects than the experience itself. Love described it as "tough, very tough." Love said that after getting out of the chamber, his body temperature rose precipitously for about 10 seconds, making him feel great post-treatment. And though scientists say that the long-term repairing effects of cryotherapy chambers are inconclusive, they do release endorphins and provide immediate relief from strenuous workouts. "You actually feel pretty refreshed when you get out of there," Love said. The treatment does have its risks, though. Players can't work out or shower beforehand because any perspiration or water on their skin will freeze in the chamber, causing frostbite. In fact, last summer Justin Gatlin, an Olympic sprinter, got severe frostbite on his feet from wearing damp socks during cryotherapy. As a result, he missed the finals in the 100-meter dash at the World Outdoor Track and Field Championships as a result. Despite stories like that, the healthy Timberwolves who tried cryotherapy enjoyed it so much that they decided they want a chamber in Minnesota. They've been vocal about that since their treatment on Tuesday, and their many tweets and Twitter pictures were undoubtedly another way to show the team how much they enjoyed the experience. Williams said he hopes the team will get its own chamber within the next couple of weeks or month. When asked whether he might invest in one with his new contract money, Love laughed. "I'll wait," he said. "We'll see if the Timberwolves get one." Perhaps that's the first request of Love's new contract, and if it's truly easing the sore feet of a strained lineup, it's not hard to see why he and his teammates might want one. Follow Joan Niesen on Twitter.
GET THE YARDBARKER APP:
Ios_download En_app_rgb_wo_45
MORE FROM YARDBARKER

More people are in favor of paying college athletes than ever

NBA commissioner Adam Silver wants a female head coach ‘sooner than later’

How significant is Celtics’ milestone of passing Cavs for the top seed?

Grant Hill reflects on Christian Laettner’s shot on its 25th anniversary

Chargers need to draft a young QB according to head coach Anthony Lynn

LIKE WHAT YOU SEE?
GET THE DAILY NEWSLETTER:

Seahawks GM stomps Marshawn Lynch rumors

Takeaways from Michigan State football head coach Mark Dantonio’s press conference

Mel Kiper: Joe Mixon is most talented RB in draft

Gonzaga's Jordan Mathews long road back to the desert

Lonzo Ball on Markelle Fultz: ‘I’m better than him’

Harden: Playing every game should count in MVP discussion

The 'Are you mentally prepared for 'One Shining Moment'?' quiz

NBA Referee Hotline Bling: Serge Ibaka can't connect

Can the Padres' Christian Bethancourt really succeed at pitcher and catcher?

The Raiders will forever belong to Oakland

The Rewind: George Mason's improbable run to the Final Four

Box Score 3/28: Wilt's last game

Baseball movies you can stream now to hold you over until Opening Day

Best, worst and hard to stomach MLB offseason moves

The 28 craziest ballpark foods for the 2017 season

Best of Yardbarker: Did Team USA's victory save the World Baseball Classic?

Breaking down the Naismith Award race

Box Score 3/24: Waiting on West Virginia

NBA News
Delivered to your inbox
You'll also receive Yardbarker's daily Top 10, featuring the best sports stories from around the web. Customize your newsletter to get articles on your favorite sports and teams. And the best part? It's free!

By clicking "Sign Me Up", you have read and agreed to the Fox Sports Digital Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. You can opt out at any time. For more information, please see our Privacy Policy.
the YARDBARKER app
Get it now!
Ios_download En_app_rgb_wo_45

The 'Are you mentally prepared for 'One Shining Moment'?' quiz

NBA Referee Hotline Bling: Serge Ibaka can't connect

Can the Padres' Christian Bethancourt really succeed at pitcher and catcher?

The Raiders will forever belong to Oakland

Best, worst and hard to stomach MLB offseason moves

The Rewind: George Mason's improbable run to the Final Four

Baseball movies you can stream now to hold you over until Opening Day

Best of Yardbarker: Did Team USA's victory save the World Baseball Classic?

Breaking down the Naismith Award race

Eat, Drink, Watch: Weekends are for upsets

Today's Best Stuff
For Publishers
Company Info
Help
Follow Yardbarker