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COVID-19 and sports: Latest updates across all leagues

It's been several months since sports in the United States came to a screeching halt amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, and the NBA, MLB and NHL seasons suddenly were put on hiatus.

Recent UFC bouts, WWE matches, NASCAR races and golf tournaments offered a glimmer of hope, and now the timelines of major sports are finally still being finalized. The NBA, NHL and MLB have announced plans to return to play, but with news breaking so often, we’ve gathered the latest stories fans need to know.

 
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NBA

NBA
NBA commissioner Adam Silver Quinn Harris-USA TODAY Sports

Here is what has happened over the last couple of weeks in the NBA:

AUGUST 13

  • NBPA head Michele Roberts met with several NBA players in Orlando to discuss logistics for next season. Roberts believes the league and union will have to negotiate a new CBA and that it will be easy to do. Next season's start date was also discussed, with several estimates floated. Roberts also believes a bubble will be needed for next season as well. Read more here.

AUGUST 12

  • Once teams advance past the first round, players will be able to have guests join them in the bubble. ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski shared that according to guidelines approved by the NBA and NBPA, players will be allowed to have up to four guests in the bubble with them, though that number can be exceeded in the case of children. Guests can choose to quarantine for three days in team markets then quarantine an additional four days in Orlando or head straight to Orlando and quarantine for a week. After testing, guests will be able to travel on team charters and once in the bubble, guests will be able to attend games. Read more here.
  • For the fourth consecutive week, the NBA has officially announced zero positive tests of the virus. Read more here.
  • As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, the NBA is making contingency plans for next season already. According to reports, the league is considering Las Vegas, Orlando, New York and Dallas as potential bubble cities in which to hold games during the 2020-21 season. Read more here.

AUGUST 11

  • Magic sharpshooter Terrence Ross wasn’t away from the NBA’s campus at Walt Disney World for long. After announcing on Monday that Ross had left to address a medical matter unrelated to COVID-19, the Magic said Tuesday morning that he has returned. Read more here.
  • The NBA announced Tuesday in a press release that it will name an All-Seeding Games Team and the Player of the Seeding Games to honor the top performers of the summer restart. Read more here.
  • Thunder guard Dennis Schröder has returned to the NBA’s campus at Walt Disney World. Read more here.

AUGUST 10

  • Montrezl Harrell, who left the NBA's Orlando bubble in July, revealed on Twitter that he's returned to Walt Disney World after tending to his grandmother who recently died. Harrell now will have to quarantine for at least four days before returning to basketball activities. Read more here.
  • While the NBA's Orlando bubble seems like a great place to be, Boston Celtics star Jaylen Brown revealed it isn't all it's cracked up to be. He says it's tough being away from his family. Read more here.
  • The 2020 NBA draft lottery will look different this year. Shams Charania of The Athletic reports it’ll be a virtual event held on Aug. 20, with reps from the lottery teams appearing via video. Read more here.

AUGUST 8

  • The NBA originally planned for the 2020-21 season to begin on Dec. 1, but now the league is reconsidering that date. According to ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski, a delay would allow fans to attend games next season. Read more here.
  • Furthermore, because of the potential delayed season, confidence in both American and international NBA players participating in next summer’s Olympics is decreasing. Read more here.

AUGUST 7

  • Clippers center Montrezl Harrell has been away from the NBA’s campus at Walt Disney World for approximately three weeks, attending to his family and grieving following the recent death of his grandmother. However, he appears to be getting close to a return. Read more here.
  • Raptors guard Patrick McCaw is leaving the NBA’s campus at Walt Disney World in order to seek treatment for a reoccurrence of a benign mass on the back of his left knee, the club announced today in a press release. Read more here.
  • While it’s unclear whether a bottom-eight resumption will actually come to fruition, don’t count Golden State Warriors star Draymond Green among its proponents. Read more here.
  • Heat guard Kendrick Nunn has left the NBA’s Walt Disney World campus for "personal reasons," according to Ira Winderman of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. His absence isn’t related to the coronavirus, Winderman adds. Read more here.

AUGUST 6

  • Steve Kerr knows that the Warriors missing the Orlando bubble is giving the team a much-needed break. Regardless, he says that the Golden State players are having a tough time watching other teams compete while they are forced to sit at home and quarantine like the rest of us. Read more here.
  • The 2020 NBA Draft Lottery, originally scheduled for May 19, will now take place on Aug. 20. Read more here.
  • Magic center Mohamed Bamba contracted COVID-19 in June, which led to subsequent conditioning issues and a large reduction in playing time during the resumption. Read more here.
  • NBA players may be averse to being regarded as snitches, but that is not stopping them from using the anonymous tip hotline in the bubble, per Chris B. Haynes. Read more here.

AUGUST 5

  • Lou Williams received heavy criticism for getting dinner at an Atlanta strip club while excused from the NBA's Orlando bubble, and it appears he regrets the decision. "In hindsight, I think as far as the public safety issue goes, I probably could have made a better-quality decision," Williams said. Read more here.
  • Gregg Popovich praised NBA commissioner Adam Silver and his leadership, via Mark Medina of USA Today, saying: "There’s absolutely no doubt that the NBA, under the leadership of Adam Silver, has done a magnificent job of being visionaries." Read more here.

AUGUST 4

  • The NBA season has gone about as well as anyone could have hoped for so far, but while the bubble appears to be a success from an on-court perspective, LeBron James says that the off-the-court aspect has proven to be quite difficult due to separating players from their families and friends. "I miss the hell out of my family," James said. "My wife, my kids, my mother. And so on and so on. So, it’s a huge challenge." Read more here.
  • The Athletic's Shams Charania and Sam Amick reported that the eight franchises currently not involved in the return-to-play scenario taking place at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex believe the second bubble won't happen. In addition, the National Basketball Players Association has concerns about keeping players safe and virus-free outside of a completely isolated environment. Read more here.

JULY 31

  • Assuming the remainder of the 2019-20 NBA season goes on without a hitch, the Association could be looking at a big financial windfall from advertisers. Advertisers that previously bought the NBA are quickly returning, and we are also seeing new advertisers come into the NBA, including 25 new advertisers in the post-season to date,” Disney Advertising Sales said in a statement. Read more here.

JULY 30

  • Rudy Gobert received plenty of criticism for his behavior leading up the coronavirus pandemic but the Jazz center says that the media's portrayal of him was unfair, as he feels he was made to be the scapegoat for the entire league shutting down. Read more here.
  • Under the NBA resumption protocols, Memphis must hold a lead of at least four-and-a-half games over the club/clubs in ninth to avoid a play-in game or games for the conference's final postseason berth. Memphis star guard and uncrowned NBA Rookie of the Year Ja Morant criticized the process during an appearance on  ESPN's "The Jump" that aired Thursday. Read more here.

JULY 28

  • NBA teams 'very much expect' to start next year without fans, according to ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski. Read more here.

JULY 23

JULY 17

 
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MLB

MLB
MLB commissioner Rob Manfred Orlando Ramirez-USA TODAY Sports

Here is the latest MLB news from the past couple of weeks:

AUGUST 13

  • MLB insider Jon Heyman tweeted that Friday's tilt between the Cardinals and Chicago White Sox at Guaranteed Rate Field has been called off after a St. Louis coach tested positive for COVID-19. Bob Nightengale of USA Today added that the Cardinals could be cleared to play a Saturday doubleheader in Chicago. Read more here.
  • A day after Indians pitcher Zach Plesac  took to Instagram  to address how he and fellow Cleveland starter Mike Clevinger violated MLB health and safety protocols by going out for a social dinner in Chicago last Saturday, the 25-year-old further explained his actions and opinions, ripping the media for the reporting on his actions. Read more here.
  • The Cardinals haven't played since July 29 because of a coronavirus outbreak, but they’ll return to the field Saturday with a doubleheader against the White Sox, which will be the first of three doubleheaders played in five days. Read more here.
  • Furthermore, the Cardinals have played just five games this season, while other teams have played 20. Insider Ken Rosenthal reported MLB and the MLBPA are working on a deal where the league would structure handfuls of doubleheaders so that the Cards can play the full 60-game season. Read more here

AUGUST 12

  • The Indians were forced to place starting pitchers Zach Plesac and Mike Clevinger on the restricted list after the two went out in Chicago following a game against the White Sox. Adam Plutko did not mince words when speaking about the behavior of his teammates. "They hurt us bad," Plutko said. "They lied to us. They sat here in front of you guys and publicly said things that they didn't follow through on." Read more here.
  • Marlins manager Don Mattingly gave positive updates on Wednesday about the 17 players associated with the team who reportedly tested positive for the virus. Per the Associated Press (h/t ESPN), Mattingly told reporters that players who remain sidelined are asymptomatic and "feeling great" but will likely require workouts before they are back in lineups. Mattingly also said a lot of the players have applied for reinstatement. Read more here.
  • MLB's considerations of creating a bubble for postseason games are apparently growing more serious. Jon Heyman of MLB Network reported Wednesday that the league is in “serious talks” about a possible playoff bubble. The league is said to prefer a two-city bubble, with California, Texas and Chicago-Milwaukee under consideration as potential sites. Read more here.

AUGUST 11

  • Liberty Media revealed, via The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Tim Tucker, that the Braves’ revenue plummeted 95% compared to the same quarter in 2019. The club generated $208 million in revenue from April through June in 2019. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, that number dropped to $11 million this year. Read more here.
  •  The Reds have reportedly submitted a proposal to the state of Ohio and MLB that would allow fans to attend games, which would make them the first and only baseball team to do so. Read more here.
  • The Indians announced that right-handers Zach Plesac and Mike Clevinger have been placed on the restricted list. Both pitchers violated the league’s health and safety protocols over the weekend when they went out after Saturday night’s game. Read more here.
  • Plesac addressed his violation of MLB health and safety protocols in Chicago over the weekend that resulted in the Tribe forcing him to take a car service from the Windy City back to Northeast Ohio. The 25-year-old referenced the subject via Instagram. Read more here.
  • Clevinger issued a statement apologizing for ignoring protocols, saying he broke "implicit trust." Read more here.

AUGUST 10

  • The Cardinals haven’t played since July 29 due to the team’s ongoing coronavirus outbreak, and manager Mike Shildt discussed the organization’s difficult battle with the virus in a radio appearance. Shildt revealed that multiple members of the team have made trips to the emergency room because they were experiencing coronavirus symptoms. Read more here.
  • According to SNY’s Andy Martino, MLB executives are now polling teams about canceling the in-person winter meetings and making the event virtual this year. The 2020 winter meetings are currently set to take place in Dallas from Dec. 6-10, but many around the league aren’t entirely comfortable with the situation. Instead, executives would prefer to conduct their business virtually, negotiating with agents and other teams from the comfort of their homes. Read more here.
  • Mets right-hander Marcus Stroman has decided to opt out of the remainder of the 2020 campaign due to coronavirus concerns. Read more here.
  • MLB has already had two COVID-19 outbreaks just a few weeks into the season. After seeing the success the NBA and NHL have had with a bubble, MLB could now look to follow the formula for the postseason and World Series. MLB officials are now considering moving the playoffs and World Series into a bubble when October arrives, per the Los Angeles Times‘ Bill Shaikin. Read more here.
  • Cleveland announced RHP  Mike Clevinger violated the team's coronavirus protocols. Jeff Passan of ESPN reported that Clevinger went out with teammate Zach Plesac on Saturday night and then flew with the Indians on Sunday. The Clevinger news is especially troublesome since he, unlike Plesac, had direct contact with the team’s traveling party after the outing. Read more here.

AUGUST 9

AUGUST 7

  • MLB and the MLBPA confirmed that seven players and six staff members tested positive for COVID-19 over the past week, which makes for a 0.1% positive rate out of 13,043 tests. Read more here.
  • Indians team president Chris Antonetti told reporters on Friday that Cleveland hitting coach Ty Van Burkleo opted out of the campaign due to coronavirus risks, per the AP (h/t ESPN). The Van Burkleo family has a special-needs child. Read more here.

AUGUST 6

  • MLB sent a memo to each of its clubs on Wednesday detailing the enhanced COVID-19 protocols that every organization must follow. While the league will offer some grace at first, it’s clear violating the safety guidelines could come with real consequences. Under the new guidelines, any player or staff member who repeatedly violates COVID-19 protocols will be subject to a suspension from the regular season and postseason. So, if MLB sees a player refusing to wear a mask in October, they could prevent them from playing. Read more here.
  • The Phillies and Marlins will play a seven-game series in September as part of reschedulings due to COVID, per SportBusiness Group's Eric Fisher. Read more here.

AUGUST 5

  • Without directly saying so, Rob Manfred seemed to blame players within the Marlins and Cardinals for coronavirus outbreaks inside those organizations that affected schedules around the league. "We believe, in the two serious outbreaks, that we can identify deviations from the protocols that resulted in the situations that we had," Manfred said. Read more here.
  • The Cardinals are changing their in-game COVID-19 policies. Per Bob Nightengale of USA Today Sports, Cardinals manager Mike Shildt has informed players who are not in the lineup that they can’t be in the dugout during games. Read more here.

AUGUST 4

  • In addition to Molina, Paul DeJong, Edmundo Sosa, Junior Fernandez, Carlos Marinez and Kodi Whitley were among the other Cardinals who contracted the virus. Read more here.
  • It's no secret that the MLB has faced some major road bumps in its attempt to play a season in the midst of a pandemic, as the league has faced multiple team outbreaks only a few weeks into the shortened season. Chicago Cubs outfielder Steven Souza Jr. voiced his frustration with MLB commissioner Rob Manfred, saying that his mishandling of this situation has left him feeling "embarrassed" about playing baseball. Read more here.

AUGUST 3

  • Some Cardinals players may have broken MLB health and safety recommendations ahead of the team experiencing a coronavirus outbreak that left its season in question. MLB insider Jon Heyman reported that "at least a couple" of Cardinals players visited a casino, which led to MLB "tightening" a rule about personnel leaving team hotels while on the road. Read more here.
  • St. Louis president of baseball operations John Mozeliak can neither confirm nor deny that players went to a casino. Mozeliak said he is unsure if the report is true but that it would be “disappointing” if it is. Read more here.
  • Miami Marlins president Derek Jeter spoke about his team’s coronavirus outbreak for the first time on Monday, admitting that the team had been too lax in taking precautions but denying that players had left the team hotel to go to bars or clubs. Read more here.

AUGUST 2

  • Yoenis Cespedes was unexpectedly absent from the Mets’ game against the Braves on Sunday, and that is because the veteran slugger has decided he no longer wants to play this season due to coronavirus concerns. Read more here.

AUGUST 1

  • MLB's investigation into the Marlins' coronavirus outbreak found that the team didn't follow health and safety protocols while in Atlanta during a preseason road trip, according to Bleacher Report's Scott Miller. Read more here.
  • As a result of the coronavirus spreading through multiple clubhouses, Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Lorenzo Cain has decided to opt out of the 2020 season, per USA Today's Bob Nightengale. Read more here.
  • Trevor Bauer is voicing his frustration amid the constant schedule changes being implemented by MLB, telling the league to "figure it the f--- out." Read more here.
  • Commissioner Rob Manfred just made a very questionable statement regarding the remainder of the 2020 season. Manfred doesn't see a reason to cancel the remainder of the baseball season despite a rising number of coronavirus cases across the league. Read more here.

JULY 31

  • MLB player safety protocols amid the coronavirus pandemic need some adjustments, and Cubs star Anthony Rizzo is encouraging the league to take notice, blasting the league on Twitter for it. Read more here.
  • Baltimore Orioles pitcher Kohl Stewart made the tough decision to opt out of the 2020 MLB season due to underlying health concerns. Read more here.
  • According to Scott Miller of Bleacher Report, MLB’s internal investigation found that Marlins players failed to strictly adhere to safety protocols during their road trip to Atlanta just prior to the start of the season. ESPN’s Marly Rivera added that there is “a lot of anger” among fellow players directed toward the Marlins. Read more here.
  • In light of the Marlins’ outbreak, some players might be taking steps to police their teammates’ behavior to prevent similar situations. Per ESPN’s T.J. Quinn, one “prominent” player told teammates that he would get them traded if they weren’t mindful of the league’s safety protocols. Read more here.

JULY 30

JULY 29

  • Lou Schwechheimer, owner of the Miami Marlins' Triple-A affiliate Wichita Wind Surge, died on Wednesday from complications caused by COVID-19. Schwechheimer was 62 years old. Read more here.

JULY 28

  • In what may be a sign of things to come for the rest of MLB, the Marlins confirmed the club is temporarily moving to daily coronavirus testing following an outbreak that paused campaigns for the Marlins and Philadelphia Phillies. Read more here.

JULY 27

  • Following an outbreak of the coronavirus in the Marlins organization, Dodgers pitcher David Price decided to reveal part of the reason why he decided to not play in 2020. "Part of the reason I’m at home right now is because players [sic] health wasn’t being put first. I can see that hasn’t changed," Price tweeted. Read more here.
  • Brewers pitcher Josh Lindblom made it clear that the MLB has an obligation to ensure safety for players and other team personnel. Per Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Lindblom said, “Somebody might have to make a hard decision.” Read more here.
  • Rockies relief pitcher Tim Collins has opted out of the 2020 MLB season, becoming the first to do so after the Marlins’ COVID-19 outbreak. Read more here.
  • Rob Manfred has shared the circumstances under which he would decide to pause a team’s season. “A team losing a number of players that rendered it completely non-competitive,” would be the circumstance, Manfred said on Monday. Read more here.
 
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NHL

NHL
NHL commissioner Gary Bettman Winslow Townson-USA TODAY Sports

Here is what the NHL has been doing over the past couple of weeks to prepare for he league's resumption:

AUGUST 10

  • For the second week of Phase 4 (Aug 2-8), the league administered 7,245 tests. It received zero positive test results. Every member of the clubs’ 52-member traveling parties was tested regularly. Read more here.
  • As had been expected, the 2020 Hockey Hall of Fame induction ceremony scheduled for Nov. 16 in Toronto has been postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. Per the Associated Press (h/t ESPN), the Hall will further discuss rescheduling ideas on Oct. 29. Chairman Lanny McDonald added that a virtual ceremony won't be considered and that the in-person event could be moved to November 2021. Read more here.

AUGUST 5

AUGUST 3

  • Back in June, Steve Simmons of the Toronto Sun reported Auston Matthews had tested positive for COVID-19. When Simmons asked Matthews a question at a postgame media session, the Maple Leafs star confronted the writer, calling his reporting "very unethical." Read more here.

AUGUST 1

  • The Bruins have been without Ondrej Kase for some time now, but the forward finally has joined the team in Toronto. Boston confirmed he returned from an absence that stemmed from him being deemed "unfit to practice" since training resumed in late July. Read more here.

JULY 30

  • The American Hockey League, the NHL's primary developmental league, has announced a tentative start date for the 2020-21 campaign amid the coronavirus pandemic: Dec. 4. Read more here.

JULY 29

JULY 25

  • Corey Crawford’s absence from the first 12 days of the Blackhawks' training camp came as a surprise, and the team was only able to provide the "unfit to play" designation. Crawford himself revealed the reason, telling reporters that he tested positive for COVID-19.  As a result, he had to spend the last couple of weeks in self-quarantine. Read more here.

JULY 24

  • Canadiens defenseman Brett Kulak and Senators center Jayce Hawryluk confirmed that they tested positive for COVID-19. They are both healthy and with their respective teams now. Read more here.
  • Neither NHL commissioner Gary Bettman nor deputy commissioner Bill Daly will be at the bubble sites in Edmonton and Toronto for the resumption of the 2019-20 season completed amid the coronavirus pandemic. Per ESPN's Greg Wyshynski, Bettman explained that they won't be in Canada on Aug. 1 because the current border closure requires that individuals entering the country from the United States must quarantine and self-isolate for 14 days. Read more here.

JULY 23

  • Xavier Ouellet  of the Montreal Canadiens confirmed to reporters that he tested positive, though his diagnosis came with plenty of confusion. Ouellet first tested negative when he arrived at training camp, before then testing positive and going into quarantine. He never experienced any symptoms and then subsequently tested negative multiple times to be allowed to rejoin the group. The defenseman isn’t even sure if he ever actually had the virus, though did confirm to Lu that a blood test confirmed antibodies. Winnipeg Jets defenseman  Anthony Bitetto meanwhile tested positive on June 24, according to team reporter Mitchell Clinton. Read more here.

JULY 22

  • Oilers GM Ken Holland told reporters that the team will take Philip Broberg into the Phase 4 bubble instead of returning him to his Swedish club. The initial plan was for Broberg, the team's 2019 first-round pick, to only participate in Phase 3 before joining Skelleftea in the SHL for their own training camp. Read more here.

JULY 21

  • The St. Louis Blues will have Ivan Barbashev in the lineup when they start their round-robin games in Edmonton, but they will lose him soon after. Tom Timmermann of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Barbashev will leave after one or two games for the birth of his child. Read more here.
  • Montreal Canadiens center Max Domi will participate in the NHL restart held amid the coronavirus pandemic even though he is a high risk for COVID-19 because he has type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. Read more here.

JULY 19

  • After an inconclusive COVID-19 test and being forced to sit out Saturday’s practice, Boston Bruins’ Charlie Coyle looks like he will be fine. The forward followed the inconclusive test with a negative test, according to The Athletic’s Fluto Shinzawa, who spoke with Coyle’s agent. Read more here.

JULY 17

  • The Bruins have put David Pastrnak in quarantine after he was directly exposed to someone with COVID-19. Although, Pastrnak himself has tested negative for COVID-19, per The Athletic’s Fluto Shinzawa. Read more here.

JULY 14

  • The Capitals will be in the round-robin seeding portion of the 24-team NHL resumption  inside the Eastern Conference bubble site in Toronto on Aug. 8, the same day Washington forward Lars Eller and his wife expect to welcome their second child into the world. As ESPN's Greg Wyshynski wrote, Eller told reporters on Tuesday that he'll temporarily leave the bubble for the birth. Read more here.

JULY 13

  • The Pittsburgh Penguins announced that nine players are currently sidelined after they were exposed to somebody who tested positive for COVID-19. The Penguins are scheduled to travel to the temporary hub site in Toronto on July 26. Read more here.
  • The Florida Panthers will be without assistant coach  Mike Kitchen for the return to play program, announcing that he has opted out. Read more here.
  • Over the weekend, The Athletic's Arpon Basu reported that at least three Canadiens players recently tested positive for the coronavirus ahead of Montreal's start of training camp sessions on Monday. On Monday, however, Basu added that the Canadiens believe two of those tests produced "false positives." It's not known if the two individuals skated with teammates on Monday. Read more here.
  • Blackhawks veteran goaltender Corey Crawford missed the opening day of training camp after he was ruled "unfit to play or to participate," per the Associated Press (h/t ESPN). It's not known if his unavailability is due to the coronavirus, as teams are not allowed to announce positive test results. Read more here. 
  • Bruins defenseman Steven Kampfer took to Twitter to state that he has opted out of the season's return. The veteran revealed that his wife and son suffer from a congenital heart defect that can be complicated by the effects of COVID-19. For that reason, he decided that no one can fault him for to put his family’s health and safety first. Read more here.

JULY 12

  • Edmonton defenseman Mike Green has opted out of the season. In a statement, the four-time All-Star cited "deeply personal family health reasons" behind his decision to sit out. Read more here

JULY 11

  • Flames defenseman Travis Hamonic is opting out of the NHL's resumption, which he announced in a statement through his agency, Titan Sports 365. Hamonic's daughter has had a previous battle with a life-threatening respiratory virus, and he has a new baby boy as well, so he is erring on the side of caution. Read more here.
  • Canucks winger Sven Baertschi was expected to be among the team's list of nine recalls for its qualifying-round series vs. Minnesota, but that won’t be the case .  He has informed the team that he has opted out of returning, reports Rick Dhaliwal of TSN 1040 and The Athletic. Read more here.

JULY 10

  • Three U.S. National Team Development Program players have tested positive for COVID-19, according to Katie Strang and Craig Custance of The Athletic. The results throw the viability of holding the World Junior Summer Showcase later this month into question. Read more here.

JULY 8

  • The NHLPA Executive Board voted on and approved the CBA extension. Included in that vote was approval for all return to play protocols as well. This now moves to the full NHLPA membership to vote on. A simple majority is required to pass the deal, and it’s fully expected to be approved. Read more here.
  • The Bruins sent an email to season ticket holders asking fans to submit virtual cheers, chants, celebrations and booing to be featured in playoff games, according to SB Nation's Stanley Cup of Chowder. Read more here.
  • The NHL has set key dates for its season. The NHL hopes to complete the 24-team model to finish the 2019-20 season by crowning a Stanley Cup champion no later than Oct. 2, per Sportsnet's Elliotte Friedman. The Final gets underway Sept. 20, which means only one day off will separate fixtures. Read more here.

JULY 7

  • The NHL plans to play three games per day at each bubble site, for a total of six contests a day, per TSN’s Bob McKenzie. These games will be held at the same times (12 p.m., 4 p.m., and 8 p.m.) but offset by the two-hour time difference local time Read more here.

JULY 6

JULY 4

  • The NHL and NHLPA are already discussing the 2020-21 season. The NHL is focused on having a full, 82-game campaign next season despite a delayed start (in December or January), per TSN's Pierre LeBrun. Read more here.

JULY 2

  • We now at least have an idea of when the free agency period will begin. TSN’s Bob McKenzie reports that the agreement to extend expiring contracts runs through Oct. 31st, which means that the league is targeting Nov. 1 as the beginning of the 2020-21 calendar, which would also serve as the opening day of free agency. Read more here.

JULY 1

  • While the NHL season still is on pause due to the coronavirus pandemic, some players still are waiting to be paid, but it seems they won't have to wait much longer. According to ESPN's Emily Kaplan, NHL players who are due signing bonuses on July 1 will be paid as scheduled. There's more than $300 million due to players across the league. Read more here.

JUNE 29

  • The Red Wings and NHL announced the cancellation of the 2020 NHL Prospect Tournament. The eight-team tournament typically takes place in September in Traverse City, Michigan, to showcase some of the game’s top young talent. Last year’s participants were the Stars, Blackhawks, Wild, Red Wings, Rangers, Blues, Blue Jackets and Maple Leafs. Read more here.

JUNE 26

  • The NHL salary cap rising within the next three seasons doesn't sound so promising amid the coronavirus pandemic. The league and players' association are working to get a deal done that would extend the current CBA. Sportsnet's Elliotte Friedman reported  that "as part of the agreement, the salary cap will be kept close to the current $81.5 million for the next three seasons. There is potential for it to go up $1 million in 2022-23." Read more here.

JUNE 22

  • A veteran player in the Western Conference told The Athletic, according to ESPN, that "guys are not happy. This is why we better have a full player vote and not just an executive board vote. But I'm not convinced (NHLPA executive director) Don (Fehr) is going to allow that because he knows there's so many of us on the fence. That's why I think the league was trying to be hush-hush on these positive tests. In my opinion, no way we play." Read more here.

JUNE 19

  • Maple Leafs star Auston Matthews has tested positive for COVID-19, according to Steve Simmons of the Toronto Sun. Simmons adds that Matthews is is quarantining and self-isolating at his Arizona residence. Read more here.

JUNE 17

  • BAUER Hockey has designed a new face shield to keep players safe in their return to action. The company writes that its mask has an "additional splash protection around the mouth while maintaining a high level of vision and breathability." It's possible the NHL might require players to wear these masks, which will be available in August. Read more here.
 
4 of 18

NFL

NFL
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

The deadline for NFL players to opt out has passed. Here is a full list of players who have decided to skip the season. But the league still has much to deal with before the season kicks off. Here is how the NFL has been preparing:

AUGUST 13

  • Jon Gruden insists a report suggesting that he attempted to prank Las Vegas Raiders players by having an assistant coach tell them he tested positive for COVID-19 is patently false. What’s more, Gruden points out such a gambit would be in extremely poor taste, as the coronavirus is no joking matter. Read more here.
  • The Seahawks released rookie CB Kemah Siverand after he was caught on camera bringing a female visitor into the team's hotel. Read more here.

AUGUST 12

  • Philadelphia head coach Doug Pederson has returned to the Eagles' practice facility just 10 days after he had tested positive for coronavirus. Read more here.
  • The latest season of "Hard Knocks" premiered on HBO, focusing on the two NFL teams based in L.A., the Rams and the Chargers. The premiere episode began with Chargers coach Anthony Lynn revealing that he had the coronavirus previously, serving as a warning to his players and staff about the dangerous infectivity of COVID-19. Read more here.
  • The Washington Football Team has announced that it will not have fans in attendance at home games for the upcoming NFL season. Read more here.
  • Conversely, Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones remains committed to allowing some number of spectators if AT&T Stadium hosts contests in 2020. Jones added that he isn't yet prepared to set an attendance number or capacity. Read more here.
  • The league has lifted its prohibition on free-agent tryouts. Unsigned players can now come into a team’s facility to be fully evaluated. The COVID-19 pandemic forced the NFL to ban clubs from hosting free agents, though an exception was recently made for players to take a physical with an interested team. Read more here.
  • The NFLPA announced that amid the ongoing pandemic, the NFL will conduct daily COVID-19 tests of all players through Sept. 5. The daily testing will end just five days before the NFL Kickoff Game between the Kansas City Chiefs and Houston Texans. Read more here.
  • Bengals WR John Ross is stepping away from the team for a bit, as Tom Pelissero of the NFL Network reports. Ross’ son has tested positive for COVID-19, so Ross is heading to Los Angeles to care for him. Read more here.
  • NFL chief medical officer Dr. Allen Sills told reporters during a Wednesday conference call that the league had conducted 109,075 COVID-19 tests through Tuesday, and that 0.46% of those tests returned positive results among players, coaches and staff members. Read more here.

AUGUST 11

AUGUST 10

  • New England Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels raised an interesting concern about potentially playing in empty stadiums in 2020. Speaking with reporters during a video conference, McDaniels indicated he is worried about giving away too much to opposing teams in such a quiet environment. Read more here.
  • In mid-July, Ravens tight end Mark Andrews told reporters he was planning to play amid the worsening coronavirus pandemic even though he suffers from diabetes and is high-risk for COVID-19. He explained his decision while speaking with reporters on Monday. Read more here.

AUGUST 9

  • Vikings linebacker Cameron Smith will miss the 2020 NFL season due to a congenital heart condition he discovered after testing positive for the coronavirus. Read more here.
  • Bucs RB Ke’Shawn Vaughn, a third-round pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, landed on the COVID-19 reserve list on July 27 after going through the first wave of COVID-19 testing with his fellow rookies. Finally, he received clearance to return this weekend. Read more here.
  • NFL officials are privately "very confident" that there will be a full 2020 season, per Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk. Some teams might have to follow bubble protocols in their cities with extended hotel stays and other unique guidelines, but there is still optimism for an uninterrupted season. Read more here.
  • The NFL and the NFL Referees Association have reached an agreement that will provide all officials with an opt-out clause and compensation for the 2020 NFL season. Read more here.

AUGUST 8

  • With increasing doubts about the college football season being played on schedule in the fall, the NFL appears ready to swoop in to fill the potential void. Per Mike Florio of ProFootballTalk, the NFL is likely to move some games to Saturdays in the event college football does not take place. Read more here.

AUGUST 7

  • According to ESPN's Jeremy Fowler, the NFL is considering the use of virtual fans in stadiums for the 2020 season. Read more here.
  • Despite eight players deciding against playing in the 2020 NFL season due to coronavirus-related concerns, Patriots head coach Bill Belichick is fully confident that the team has sufficient protocols in place to protect players and team staff against COVID-19. Read more here.
  • Vic Beasley is in the building. The outside linebacker reported to the Titans for COVID-19 testing on Friday morning, according to beat reporter Paul Kuharsky. Beasley has no-showed throughout the offseason, despite having just signed a one-year, $9.5M free-agent deal with the Titans in March. Read more here.
  • Panthers left tackle Russell Okung reportedly is considering retirement due to coronavirus concerns, sources told ESPN's Jeremy Fowler. Okung missed 10 games last season with a pulmonary embolism due to blood clots and likely is at higher risk of coronavirus infection. Read more here.
  • The NFL is changing its testing policy in the wake of the Matthew Stafford debacle. He had a false positive, Detroit placed him on the reserve/COVID-19 list despite the fact that he was not showing any symptoms and had not come into contact with someone who contracted the virus. The league announced on Friday that if a player has no known confirmed infection, is asymptomatic but tests positive, he would only be given two more tests to to confirm. If these are negative, said player would not be considered infected. Previously, an “infected” player would have to test negative three consecutive times over a multi-day period. Read more here.

AUGUST 6

  • Rams star Aaron Donald will not wear a face shield for the 2020 season, he relayed. Read more here.
  • Will the NFL actually be able to finish its season? Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin admitted that at this point, he's not sure. Read more here.
  • Former Cowboys safety Darren Woodson opened about his struggle with the coronavirus, saying that his battle with COVID-19 felt like being in a "car crash." He wants to share his story as a warning to NFL players as they prepare for the upcoming season. Read more here.
  • The Dolphins have placed six players on the Reserve COVID-19 list: Raekwon Davis, Benito Jones, Brandon Jones, Solomon Kindley, Shaq Lawson and Kirk Merritt. Read more here.
  • Lions linebacker Jamie Collins believes players will still try to opt out depending on circumstances, even though the formal deadline passed. Read more here.
  • The Packers won't allow fans to enter Lambeau Field for at least the first two games of the 2020 regular season. Read more here.

AUGUST 5

  • According to data compiled by ticket search engine site TicketIQ, the Raiders will suffer an estimated loss of $571 million in ticket market value loss for the 2020 season after announcing they will not allow fans to attend games in Las Vegas. Read more here.

AUGUST 4

  • Former NFL offensive tackle Tootie Robbins, who played in the league for more than a decade, died at the age of 62 after contracting COVID-19. Robbins, who began his career with the St. Louis/Phoenix Cardinals as a fourth-round pick, before ending his career with the Packers, played in 159 career games. Read more here.
  • Gardner Minshew's time on the reserve/COVID-19 list was short, as the Jaguars quarterback was activated from the list on Tuesday morning and can begin resuming football activities immediately. Read more here.
  • In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Beckham all but stated he’s against the NFL holding its season amid the ongoing and worsening coronavirus pandemic. In response to Beckham’s comments Tuesday, Berry warned the enigmatic wideout about the power of his words. Read more here.
  • The Detroit Lions announced that star quarterback Matthew Stafford has been activated off the reserve/COVID-19 list, as he had a false positive. Read more here.
  • Kelly Stafford, wife of Detroit Lions star quarterback Matthew Stafford, is displeased at the NFL over the way it handled his COVID-19 results. In an Instagram post shared Tuesday, Kelly Stafford shared that the “past four days have been somewhat of a nightmare” after believing that her husband was positive for COVID-19. Read more here.
  • Tom Pelissero of the NFL Network reports that signing bonus proration for players who opt out will not count against a team’s 2020 cap. Read more here.

AUGUST 3

  • New Orleans has rented out four floors of a hotel in downtown New Orleans in order to create an optional bubble-like atmosphere for players and staff who choose to stay there during training camp, according to ESPN's Mike Triplett. Read more here.
  • In a statement to season-ticket holders sent out Monday, Raiders owner Mark Davis confirmed that the new Allegiant Stadium will not host any fans in 2020. Read more here.
  • The Broncos revealed a new method that they hope will combat the coronavirus. Before players hit the practice field for conditioning, they are put through a misting machine. According to ProFootballTalk, the machine is dispensing a spray called “MicroSURE”. The product is promoted as a nontoxic disinfectants that can kill any virus it makes contact with. Read more here.

AUGUST 2

  • Doug Pederson has tested positive for the coronavirus. The good news is he is asymptomatic and feeling fine. Read more here.

JULY 29

  • Bucs head coach Bruce Arians revealed that he plans to wear a mask and shield on the sideline this season as a precaution against COVID-19. Read more here.
  • Due to the NFL's new health and safety protocols, the Lions redesigned their locker room, and they shared photos of the update on Wednesday. From the photos, it appears some lockers are more socially distant than others, but all stalls have plexiglass dividers between them. Read more here.
  • Saints head coach Sean Payton talked about the difficulties every team will face this fall and admitted he wouldn’t be surprised if a COVID-19 outbreak forces the NFL to suspend games. Read more here.
  • Eagles offensive tackle Lane Johnson confirmed via Twitter that he tested positive for the coronavirus. He held his annual "OL Masterminds Summit" in Dallas earlier this month, and many in attendance were seen not properly wearing face coverings and/or failing to observe social-distancing guidelines. Read more here.

JULY 28

  • According to Sportico’s Mike Freeman, many coaches, general managers and team officials are against playing football during the COVID-19 pandemic. Read more here.
  • Jets head coach Adam Gase revealed the organization has talked about placing a quarterback in quarantine this season. Read more here.

JULY 25

  • The adjusted CBA approved by both the NFL and NFLPA includes bans on many social functions, per Mike Florio of ProFootballTalk. Players will not be allowed to attend indoor bars or nightclubs, indoor house parties with greater than 15 people, indoor concerts, indoor worship services that allow greater than 25 percent capacity, and other professional sporting events. Read more here.

JULY 23

  • The NFL has developed a face shield players can wear during games that could help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Mike Garafolo of NFL Network shared a sketch of the face shield. See it here.
 
5 of 18

Golf

Golf
Phil Mickelson, Tom Brady, Peyton Manning and Tiger Woods recently participated in a charity golf match. Mike Ehrmann-Handout Photo

The latest from the world of golf since competition resumed:

AUGUST 12

  • After being postponed in April due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Masters Tournament has been rescheduled to be played Nov. 12-15 without fans in attendance. The event was announced by Augusta National chairman Fred Ridley, who made it clear that "the health and safety of everyone associated with the Masters always has been our first and most important priority." Read more here.

AUGUST 5

  • The European Tour announced that American golfer John Catlin and caddie Nathan Mulrooney were withdrawn from this week's English Championship because they violated the competition's coronavirus health and safety protocols. Read more here.

JULY 29

  • Roughly two weeks after PGA commissioner Jay Monahan  suggested the U.S. Open in Mamaroneck, New York could welcome fans, USGA CEO Mike Davis announced in an official statement that the 120th edition of the tournament held at Winged Foot Golf Club from Sept. 17-20 will happen behind closed doors. Read more here.

JULY 19

  • Golf legend Jack Nicklaus revealed that he and his wife, Barbara, battled COVID-19 earlier this year, per Golf Digest's Brian Wacker. Barbara did not experience symptoms, while the 80-year-old Nicklaus said he had a sore throat and a cough but was not symptomatic for very long. Read more here.

JULY 15

  • The 2020-21 season is scheduled to begin in September, and PGA commissioner Jay Monahan remained open to fans potentially attending at least a couple of tournaments before the new year while touching upon the subject on Wednesday, per ESPN's Mike Wells. Read more here.

JULY 14

  • After nearly five months away, Tiger Woods is set to return to the PGA Tour when he competes at the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio. Why didn't Woods decide to come back earlier, like many other golfers did? The 15-time major winner says he wanted to make sure he felt safe and comfortable before officially returning. Read more here.

JULY 13

  • The remainder of the 2019-20 PGA Tour season will finish without fans attending tournaments due to the worsening coronavirus pandemic, the PGA announced. Read more here.

JULY 9

  • The PGA Tour announced the 2020 World Golf Championships-FedEx St. Jude Invitational held at TPC Southwind in Memphis will occur July 30-Aug. 2 as scheduled but without spectators in attendance due to the worsening coronavirus pandemic. Read more here.

JULY 7

  • The PGA of America is planning to announce that the Ryder Cup (scheduled to occur at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin this September) is postponed until 2021 because of the coronavirus pandemic, per ESPN's Bob Harig. Read more here.

JULY 6

  • The Jack Nicklaus Memorial Tournament held at the Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio from July 16-19 will not welcome spectators as hoped amid the coronavirus pandemic. Read more here.

JULY 3

  • PGA Tour golfer Cameron Champ isn't convinced he had the coronavirus when he withdrew from the Travelers Championship last week. Champ says that even though he tested positive ahead of the Travelers Championship, that it probably was a false positive. "Through the specialist that we worked with, at this point it's clear that I never had it,'' Champ said, according to Yahoo Sports. ''Still being precautious because if I happen to do get it, then it affects my family deeply.'' Read more here.

JUNE 29

  • Harris English withdrew from the Rocket Mortgage Classic held in Detroit after he became the fifth PGA Tour player to test positive for the coronavirus. English did not play in last week's Travelers Championship at TPC River Highlands in Hartford, Conn., but he tested positive on Monday upon his arrival to Detroit. Read more here.

JUNE 27

  • The PGA Tour has announced a major change to one of its safety policies in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak among golfers. The new rule prohibits players from coming on property while waiting for their first test results in a new city, according to ESPN's Nick Pietruszkiewicz. Starting next week, all who are considered to be "inside the bubble" will need a negative test result before being allowed on the course. This includes players, caddies, instructors, doctors and other various staff members. The Tour previously allowed players and caddies to come on site while awaiting their coronavirus test results. Read more here.

JUNE 26

  • "At least one player, possibly two, tested have positive for COVID-19 at the Travelers Championship," reported Brian Wacker of Golf Digest. It’s not yet known which player(s) tested positive for the virus. Read more here.
  • Denny McCarthy then withdrew from the Travelers Championship held at TPC River Highlands in Hartford after he became the third PGA Tour player confirmed to test positive for the coronavirus. Read more here.

JUNE 24

  • Graeme McDowell is set to withdraw from the Travelers Championship on Wednesday following the news that his caddie has tested positive for the coronavirus. McDowell's caddie, Ken Comboy, believes he may have been exposed to the virus after the Charles Schwab Challenge two weeks ago when he was forced to fly in a full commercial flight to Orlando because his private plane was too small for his traveling party. Read more here.
  • Brooks Koepka is withdrawing from this week's Travelers Championship as well after his caddie, Ricky Elliott, tested positive for the coronavirus, the golfer told Golfweek's Eamon Lynch. Elliott previously tested negative for the virus on Monday but received his positive diagnosis after a test Wednesday morning at TPC River Highlands. Read more here.
  • PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan confirmed that Webb Simpson and Chase Koepka added their names to the list of players who pulled out from this week's Travelers Championship held at TPC River Highlands in Hartford, Conn. due to COVID-19 concerns. Monahan explained that Chase Koepka and Simpson both produced negative on-site tests but withdrew out of caution. Read more here.

JUNE 23

  • The PGA Tour has confirmed its second positive COVID-19 test since resuming its season amid the pandemic this month. The PGA announced that Cameron Champ withdrew from the Travelers Championship held at TPC River Highlands in Hartford, Conn., after he recorded a positive test. Read more here.

JUNE 22

  • The PGA Tour confirmed that the PGA Championship would go down at San Francisco's Harding Park without spectators because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. The first major championship of the season won't be moved from Harding Park even though the Tour strongly considered relocating the tournament so that a percentage of spectators could watch the action in person. Instead, the PGA Championship, postponed from May 14-17 to Aug. 6-9, will take place on the West Coast as planned. Read more here.
  • The Ryder Cup — originally scheduled to take place this September at Whistling Straits in Wisconsin — likley will be postponed to 2021, according to Ewan Murray of The Guardian. Murray adds that the PGA of America and the European Tour, which both chair the Ryder Cup, won't consider holding the competition without fans on the course. Read more here.

JUNE 19

  • Roughly 48 hours after the PGA Tour boasted about recording zero positive results among 954 on-site coronavirus tests over the past two weeks, one player has reportedly tested positive for COVID-19. Rival's Nathan Hubbard tweeted the news on Friday and added that the Tour hasn't yet confirmed. Read more here.

JUNE 18

  • Despite a mandatory two-week quarantine following international travel to the U.S., Rory McIlroy says that anyone who is serious about golfing should be willing to deal with it. McIlroy has been staying in his home in Florida, so travel to the U.S. hasn't been an issue for him. "We all have the means to rent a very nice house ... and it's not a hardship for two weeks to come over and quarantine," he said, per ESPN. Read more here.

JUNE 17

  • The PGA Tour has recorded its second straight week of no positive COVID-19 tests among players, caddies and other personnel. The Tour administered 954 on-site tests, and they all have come back negative. Read more here.

JUNE 15


 
6 of 18

NASCAR

NASCAR
Kevin Harvick won the Real Heroes 400. Brynn Anderson-Pool Photo

What's the latest from the world of NASCAR:

JULY 16

  • Over 20,000 fans were in attendance at Wednesday night's NASCAR All-Star Race at Bristol Motor Speedway to watch fan-favorite Chase Elliott pull off another win. The event is believed to have the highest attendance of any sporting event in America since the pandemic began. Read more here.

JULY 10

  • Jimmie Johnson was forced to miss a race for the first time in his career following a positive coronavirus test, and he expressed his confusion with the whole situation, as he never had any symptoms and tested negative just three days later. "My first response was just anger. I started cussing and used every cuss word that I knew of and I think invented a few new ones," Johnson said. "It was just so weird — the anger — because I've been asymptomatic. Anger hits. Read more here.

JULY 8

  • After testing positive for COVID-19 last week and missing the Brickyard 400, seven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson will return to the track. The 44-year-old tested negative for the coronavirus twice, according to the Associated Press, and has been cleared to race at Kentucky Speedway. Read more here.

JULY 3

  • NASCAR legend Jimmie Johnson announced in a statement that he has tested positive for COVID-19. As a result, he will miss Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. “My first priority is the health and safety of my loved ones and my teammates,” Johnson said in a statement. “I’ve never missed a race in my Cup career." Read more here.

JUNE 30

JUNE 9

  • NASCAR announced fans will be allowed to attend races on a limited basis starting on Sunday, June 14. There will be 1,000 military members invited to attend Sunday's Dixie Vodka 400 in Miami, while 5,000 fans can sit in the grandstand at the GEICO 500 at Talladega on June 21. NASCAR will implement numerous safety guidelines at the first sporting events with fans in attendance since the pandemic began. Read more here.

JUNE 1

  • Sports Business Journal's Adam Stern reported NASCAR executives recently had discussions about allowing fans to return to the stands as early as some time in June. Stern cites Homestead-Miami Speedway and Talladega Superspeedway as tracks that could be among the first to welcome fans (in a limited capacity) back to the stands. Read more here.

MAY 17

  • NASCAR returned with the Real Heroes 400 at Darlington Raceway. The race, which was won by Kevin Harvick, featured increased safety measures, including social distancing, limited team members and temperature checks. The event drew over 6.3 million viewers. The Xfinity Series resumed on May 21 in Darlington. Chase Briscoe won the race.
 
7 of 18

NCAA athletics

NCAA athletics
NCAA president Mark Emmert Robert Deutsch-USA TODAY Sports

Several conferences have announced that fall sports are canceled, the biggest among them being the Big Ten and Pac-12. However, the ACC, SEC and Big 12 are holding steadfast in playing fall sports. Here is the fallout from the most recent news from the NCAA:

AUGUST 13

  • In a conference call with reporters on Thursday, several of the NCAA’s chief medical officers opened up about the risks of student-athletes playing during a national health crisis. They sound far more concerned about the risks than doctors representing some of the NCAA’s top athletic conferences. Read more here.
  • A Florida State wide receiver blasted the football program for reportedly lying to him about coronavirus exposure. Warren Thompson, a sophomore, slammed the program in an Instagram post after another wide receiver tested positive for COVID-19. Thompson says he was lied to about conditions of other players as well as his current health situation. He also says the program cares more about its future than the current athletes. Read more here.
  • It appears Nebraska won't play football this fall. Nebraska chancellor Ronnie Green and president Ted Carter issued a joint statement on the matter, confirming the university's commitment to the Big Ten. As ESPN's Dave Wilson noted, the Big Ten currently holds the media rights for Nebraska sports programs, including football. This always made the Huskers and any other league member playing outside the conference unlikely even for one season. Read more here.
  • A report surfaced that over a dozen college basketball programs could embrace a "bubble" format this holiday season. Per ESPN's Jeff Borzello, Houston event operator Rhossi Carron sent a proposal to at least 50 college programs for a nonconference schedule that would include 20 teams and would finish over three weeks in December. Much like how the NHL separated franchises inside hubs located in Toronto and Edmonton, this idea would split the 20 accepted college teams into two groups of 10. Teams would quarantine before students left campuses around Thanksgiving and then quarantine again at the bubble site before they were cleared to practice and play. Read more here.
  • One day after Ohio State's Ryan Day campaigned for an eight-game conference schedule that would begin the first week of January 2021, Purdue's Jeff Brohm proposed an eight-fixture slate that would run from Feb. 27 to April 17 while speaking with ESPN. Postseason play would conclude around May 15 and include some type of playoffs. Read more here.
  • Mark Emmert has announced that there won't be any fall sports championships, with the exception of FBS football, due to the fact that there won't be enough schools participating. Read more here.
  • The Horizon League became the latest collegiate body to postpone all fall sports due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Read more here.

AUGUST 12

  • According to NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport, more college football stars are expected to announce in the coming days that they will opt out of the upcoming season and will declare for the 2021 NFL Draft. Read more here.
  • The Big 12 is still planning to have games beginning in September. On Wednesday, the league released its full conference schedule. The plan at the moment for the Big 12 is to have opening weekend on Sept. 26, which is about a month later than originally scheduled. Teams will each play nine games and have two bye weeks, allowing for flexibility in case a game needs to be postponed. Read more here.
  • Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby explained his reasoning behind moving forward with football: “Well, the biggest argument is that nobody has told us that it’s poorly advised to go forward and do what we are doing. If we get to the place where our doctors and scientists say, ‘You know what? You guys have got two wheels off the tracks and you’re headed for a train wreck,’ we will pivot that day. If it’s during camp, it’s during camp. If it’s during October, it’s during October. If it’s the week before our championship game, that’s what it is.” Read more here.
  • Ohio State coach Ryan Day isn't giving up on his team playing a 2020 college football schedule, even if doing so means pushing the kickoff of the campaign to January 2021. Per Ben Axelrod of WKYC, Day spoke with reporters via a Zoom conference call one day after the Big Ten postponed football and other fall sports due to the coronavirus pandemic. Day campaigned for an eight-game, conference-only Big Ten schedule that, under his plan, would begin immediately after the new year. Read more here.
  • Nebraska has voiced its displeasure with the Big Ten's decision to cancel the fall football season, with rumors floating that the Cornhuskers are willing to play football outside of the conference. However, Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren says that if the Big Ten isn't playing in the fall, then Nebraska isn't allowed to play either. Read more here.
  • A day after both the Big Ten and Pac-12 postponed football and other fall sports due to the uncontrolled virus outbreak, NCAA senior vice president of basketball Dan Gavitt defiantly declared via an online discussion he's planning for a 2021 tournament. Read more here.
  • UCLA Bruins basketball head coach Mark Cronin said he is 100 percent confident there will be an NCAA Tournament next year. Cronin believes the schedule will be flexible about whether the event is in March like usual or pushed back. Read more here.

AUGUST 11

  • Many of those involved with the Ohio State football program appear to badly want to play this fall, and their head coach says they are willing to explore many options to make this happen. Ryan Day said on ESPN Monday that the Buckeyes are open to exploring another conference to play in. Read more here.
  • Penn State coach James Franklin echoed Day's words. Franklin was asked during an appearance on ESPN’s “Get Up!” if he would consider putting together a non-Big Ten schedule for Penn State if the conference cancels its 2020 football season. The coach did not rule it out, noting that he will follow the guidance of medical professionals. Read more here.
  • The University of Massachusetts is canceling its upcoming football season, the latest domino to fall as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic in college sports. UMass, an FBS independent program, announced the cancellation of its football season on Tuesday due to growing concerns for player safety. The decision comes less than a week after UConn canceled its football season.Read more here.
  • According to SEC commissioner Greg Sankey, a major factor in the conference's deliberation has been its medical advisory group, which he says has not urged the conference to cancel sports despite the pandemic. Read more here.
  • The Big Ten has officially announced the postponement of all fall sports via a statement. Football, field hockey, women's volleyball, men's and women's cross country, and men's and women's soccer are all impacted. Read more here.
  • The Pac-12 has followed the Big Ten in announcing the cancellation of all fall sports in 2020. As first reported by Brett McMurphy of Stadium, the Pac-12 will not play sports in fall, and an official announcement will be made Tuesday afternoon. Read more here.
  • Several college football players were devastated after both the Big Ten and Pac-12 decided to cancel their 2020 seasons on Tuesday, and Ohio State star Justin Fields was among those who expressed their disappointment. Read more here.
  • The Big 12 is planning to move forward with a college football season this fall despite two other Power 5 conferences announcing the opposite on Tuesday. Read more here.
  • Furthermore, the SEC and ACC announced neither is changing course regarding plans for fall football schedules as of Aug. 11. Read more here.
  • Count Urban Meyer among those who think that postponing college football until spring may as well be the same thing as canceling the season. The former Ohio State coach does not think spring college football is feasible. He believes it would be too much to ask students to potentially play two seasons in one calendar year, even if one or both of those seasons is abbreviated. Read more here.

AUGUST 10

  • Indiana Hoosiers offensive lineman Brady Feeney still is dealing with serious health complications due to COVID-19. On Monday morning, he responded to Michigan State’s Connor Heyward, who wrote that the players tweeting #WeWantToPlay “gonna be the same ones complaining if they get Covid and something happen to them.” Feeney wrote: “Covid-19 is serious. I never thought that I would have serious health complications from this virus, but look at what happened. We need to listen to our medical experts.” Read more here.
  • On Sunday night, Clemson’s Trevor Lawrence and Darien Rencher organized a historic Zoom call with other top players from the major conferences around the nation. It led to a unified front on Twitter in the form of a #WeWantToPlay campaign that included a list of demands. Similar to what the Pac-12 players have demanded of their conference, the #WeWantToPlay movement is centered around health and safety issues related to COVID-19. Read more here.
  • In addition, Lawrence and other players in the movement are leading the charge for the formation of a players’ union in college football. Read more here.
  • It appears the Big Ten Conference won't play football in 2020. Sources told Orion Sang, David Jesse, Chris Solari and Chris Thomas of the Detroit Free Press that the conference's presidents have voted to cancel the fall football season due to coronavirus concerns. The Big Ten becomes the first Power 5 conference to opt against playing the 2020 football season. The conference reportedly is trying to coordinate the announcement with other conferences. Read more here.
  • Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh is hoping conference officials will change their minds. Harbaugh issued a lengthy statement breaking down why he believes schools should play. He said his argument has nothing to do with his personal desire to play or that of his players, but rather “the facts accumulated over the last eight weeks since our players returned to campus on June 13.” Read more here.
  • University of Tennessee Chancellor Donde Plowman hinted via Twitter that the Volunteers will play home games at Neyland Stadium this fall. Read more here.
  • The Mountain West Conference is postponing football and all fall sports seasons because of the worsening coronavirus pandemic, per Stadium's Brett McMurphy. Read more here.
  • Crimson Tide coach Nick Saban told ESPN's Chris Low that he believes Alabama players are safer within the football program than at home. "We have around a 2% positive ratio on our team since the Fourth of July. It's a lot higher than that in society," Saban said. Read more here.
  • Notre Dame announced that 33 students out of 11,836 who were tested for COVID-19 returned positive results. Of those tested, 0.28% were positive, while 99.7% provided negative coronavirus results. Read more here.

AUGUST 8

  • The Mid-American Conference will not be having a 2020 fall football season. The conference confirmed all fall sports will be postponed. Read more here.
  • As a result, Yahoo’s Pete Thamel reported a MAC assistant told him competing teams are trying to poach that conference's players. Read more here.

AUGUST 7

  • The SEC detailed its coronavirus-related protocols. All players will be tested for the coronavirus at least twice per week — on Sundays and Wednesdays. The SEC also is looking at ways to implement a third test closer to game day that would be rapid and accurate. Read more here.
  • If any Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) playoffs occur for the 2020-21 season, it won't be until next year. The lower half of Division I collegiate football won't have a required 50 percent of teams playing for a standard fall regular season. Campaigns and the playoffs could, however, be moved to the spring. Read more here.
  • The Conference USA Board of Directors announced via an official statement that the league has approved a football schedule that includes eight conference games and up to four nonconference matchups. Read more here.

AUGUST 6

  • Several college basketball power conferences have discussed potentially playing a 2020-21 season in a bubble-type setting. This would allow college basketball players to be in a safer environment while still taking courses online, per Jon Rothstein of CBS Sports. Read more here.
  • The annual game between Navy and Notre Dame has been one of the best traditions in college football for decades. Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the iconic rivalry game is canceled for the 2020 season. Read more here.
  • Miami defensive end Gregory Rousseau informed coach Manny Diaz he is opting out of the 2020 season. Rousseau broke out last season and landed on the draft radar. He registered 15.5 sacks — tied for the third-most in ACC single-season history — and 19.5 tackles for loss. Read more here.
  • Florida State defensive tackle Marvin Wilson said that he never considered skipping the upcoming season, even as he has become one of college football's most prominent voices for racial justice. Read more here.
  • After a vote among the conference’s 13 teams, it has been decided that the Big Sky has canceled the 2020 college football season. Read more here.
  • The annual football game between Florida and Florida State was removed from the 2020 schedule after the SEC, which includes Florida among its member schools, moved to a conference-only slate for a campaign planned to be held amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is looking into getting the showdown rescheduled. Read more here.
  • Purdue star wide receiver Rondale Moore has opted out of 2020 college football season. Read more here.
  • Clemson defensive end Xavier Thomas is likely to miss the majority of the 2020 season following bouts with COVID-19 and strep throat. Read more here.
  • The Louisville men's soccer team has dismissed three players and suspended three others upon learning that they held a party linked with a coronavirus outbreak that caused four of the school's programs to temporarily pause workouts. Read more here.

AUGUST 5

  • The University of Connecticut won't have a 2020 football season. The school announced Wednesday that it is canceling the 2020 football campaign due to the coronavirus pandemic. UConn is the first FBS school to shut down due to the coronavirus. Read more here.
  • A bombshell report alleged Colorado State’s football coaches have been openly defying coronavirus protocols and threatening players who follow them, but several members of the team have come out and denied the allegations. Read more here.
  • The NCAA announced the cancellation of all Division III fall sports championships for 2020-21 due to the worsening coronavirus pandemic. Read more here.
  • The AAC announced plans for its football schedule that, per ESPN's Andrea Adelson, includes eight games against league opponents and up to four contests versus non-conference teams. Read more here.
  • The College Football Playoff Management Committee announced on Wednesday that final rankings for the 2020-21 season will be revealed on Dec. 20. The CFP semifinals will take place on Jan. 1 with the championship game still scheduled for Jan. 11 at Hard Rock Stadium. Read more here.
  • Minnesota wide receiver Rashod Bateman opted out of the 2020 season. He has declared for the 2021 draft. Read more here.
  • The Division II Presidents Council has canceled fall sports championships for 2020-21. Read more here.

AUGUST 4

  • The Sun Belt announced that its football season will begin over Labor Day weekend and that member programs will play eight conference games. Teams may also schedule up to four non-league games for the campaign. Read more here.
  • LSU linebacker Travez Moore took to Twitter to offer a warning to peers and others who may not be taking the coronavirus seriously during preparations for the 10-game, conference-only SEC football season. The senior tweeted about his experience with the virus. Read more here.

AUGUST 3

  • Arizona Wildcats freshman receiver Jaden Mitchell took to Twitter on Monday to share his harrowing experience with battling COVID-19. Read more here.

AUGUST 2

  • One of the things college football teams are doing to try to mitigate the risk of COVID-19 is provide players with a special COVID face-shield helmet. LSU linebacker Soni Fonua shared a short video that shows why those helmets may be problematic. He says it's difficult for him to breathe while wearing it. Read more here.

JULY 31

  • The Longhorns football players will be wearing special helmets this coming season that feature a face shield. Check them out here.

JULY 30

  • Notre Dame will partner with the ACC for the upcoming college football season but according to the school's athletic director, the decision was made due to the coronavirus pandemic rather than "Notre Dame's long-term assessment of independence." Read more here.
  • The SEC will begin a 10-game conference-only slate that kicks off on Sept. 26. Winners of the two divisions will meet for the SEC Championship Game on Dec. 19. Read more here.

JULY 29

  • Virginia Tech cornerback Caleb Farley has elected to skip any version of a college football season held amid the coronavirus pandemic so he can prepare for the 2021 NFL Draft. Read more here.
  • The ACC has finalized its model for the football season, which includes 10 in-conference games and one nonconference game. Notre Dame will also play under these league rules and, thus, will be eligible to compete in the ACC Championship Game. Read more here.

JULY 17

  • The America East Conference and Atlantic 10 Conference became the latest collegiate bodies to cancel fall sports due to the worsening coronavirus pandemic. Read more here.
 
8 of 18

Tennis

Tennis
Wimbledon was canceled for the first time in 75 years. Susan Mullane-USA TODAY Sports

Here is what has happened most recently in the world of tennis:

AUGUST 4

  • Defending U.S. Open champion Rafael Nadal announced via Twitter that he will skip this year's edition of the tournament due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Read more here.

JULY 30

  • Ashleigh Barty, currently the no. 1-ranked women's tennis player in the world, announced that she will not participate in the U.S. Open next month due to safety concerns.  The 24-year-old Australian made the announcement, explaining that she felt uncomfortable about traveling in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. Read more here.

JULY 10

  • Even though Wimbledon has been canceled, all qualified players still will get paid. The All England Lawn and Tennis Club, which hosts Wimbledon, announced Friday that it will pay prize money to all players that would have qualified for the canceled tournament, according to ESPN. Read more here.

JULY 8

  • Tennis star Novak Djokovic has become a very controversial character since his Adria Tour was held with thousands of spectators amid the coronavirus pandemic. Djokovic and his wife later tested positive, and so did other tour participants. Now he thinks the media has treated him unfairly. "It’s like an agenda and a witch-hunt are on," Djokovic told the Serbian newspaper, Sportski Zurnal, (h/t TMZ). Read more here.

JULY 2

  • Novak Djokovic and his wife have tested negative for coronavirus just 10 days after it was revealed the couple had tested positive. After testing positive, Djokovic and Jelena went into self-isolation, and before testing negative, the two had not shown any symptoms of COVID-19. The two tested positive shortly after Djokovic organized the Adria Tour, an exhibition held in Zadar, Croatia. Read more here.
  • The French Open is planning to have fans in the stands, as the French Tennis Federation announced that over half the amount of usual fans will be allowed to attend the tournament. "The number of spectators allowed in the stadium will be 50%-60% of the usual capacity," the FFT said. "This reduction will allow strict distancing measures to be respected." Read more here.

JUNE 24

  • There is some drama in the tennis world in the wake of Novak Djokovic testing positive for the coronavirus. The world No. 1's father has accused Bulgaria's Grigor Dimitrov of causing the spike in COVID-19 cases that has seen both Novak and his wife, Jelena, infected. Dimitrov was the first player to test positive for COVID-19 after the second leg of Djokovic's exhibition tournament that began in Serbia before moving on to Croatia. Read more here.

JUNE 23

  • Novak Djokovic, the No. 1 tennis player in the world, tested positive for coronavirus shortly after organizing and participating in an "exhibition" in Croatia. Djokovic announced his wife had tested positive as well, explaining "the moment we arrived in Belgrade we went to be tested. My result is to positive." Read more here.

JUNE 17

  • Serena Williams has confirmed she will play in the U.S. Open, which will take place without fans in attendance. "I really cannot wait to return in New York and play the U.S. Open 2020," Williams said. The Open runs from Aug. 31 through Sept. 13 and will be the first Grand Slam tournament since tennis play was suspended in March. Read more here.

JUNE 16

  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo officially gave the go-ahead for the U.S. Open to begin as scheduled, which would make it the first sporting event to be held in New York since the COVID-19 pandemic began. With the schedule tentatively set, the big question remaining is will the big names in tennis show up for the tournament? Read more here.
  • Nick Kyrgios has criticized the plan, calling the idea of not delaying the tournament "selfish" in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. Read more here.

JUNE 15

  • One of the biggest tennis tournaments in the United States is set to begin at the end of the summer, and the USTA reportedly is moving ahead with its plans to play the US Open beginning on Aug. 31, according to ESPN's Peter Bodo. The ATP and WTA have "embraced" the plan, Bodo adds citing sources, and it appears the USTA will make an announcement regarding the US Open once they get the green light from health officials in New York. Read more here.

JUNE 8

  • Novak Djokovic expressed concerns about participating in the U.S. Open in August due to the extreme restrictions that are expected to be put in place due to the coronavirus. Djokovic noted that players would be able to bring only a single person to the club, which he was skeptical about. Read more here.


 
9 of 18

Pro wrestling

Pro wrestling
This year's WrestleMania still took place. Kevin R. Wexler/NorthJersey.com-NorthJersey

Pro wrestling news over the past few weeks:

JULY 30

  • While professional sports commissioners and team owners frequently comment on financial losses amid the coronavirus pandemic, World Wrestling Entertainment enjoyed a fruitful second quarter of the economic year. Per Dave Meltzer of the Wrestling Observer, WWE claimed during a Thursday earnings report that the promotion generated $43.8 million in profits for Q2. Read more here.

JULY 20

  • WWE legend Ric Flair has informed the New York Post that Wendy Barlow, his wife, has tested positive for the coronavirus. “My wife does [have the virus]… we live in a 5,000-square-foot home," Flair reportedly said. "I live in the basement. She lives upstairs on the third floor and she got sick.” Flair is considered high risk for the coronavirus because of his age and his medical history. Read more here.

JULY 6

  • PWInsider's Mike Johnson reported that WWE relocated SummerSlam and the accompanying editions of "Raw" and "SmackDown" to its Performance Center because of the uncontrolled virus outbreak. The pay-per-view card will occur at the Florida site on Aug. 23. According to the Wrestling Observer, an NXT Takeover show is scheduled to air on the WWE Network on Aug. 22. Read more here.

JULY 2

  • Former WWE wrestler Kane now goes by another name: Mayor Glenn Jacobs, who is mayor of Knox County, Tennessee. The county's board of health voted on an ordinance to make wearing masks mandatory for anyone who is inside certain buildings. The ordinance passed 7-1, with the lone "no" vote cast by Jacobs, according to Jack Baer of Yahoo Sports. Kane, of course, was known for wearing a mask during his WWE tenure. Interestingly, Jacobs does not believe in wearing masks during a pandemic. Read more here.

JUNE 26

  • John Pollock of Post Wrestling confirmed that WWE postponed taping for Monday's "Raw" from Friday to Saturday, while the June 26 edition of "SmackDown" was still being produced live-to-tape as originally intended. As noted by Post Wrestling, on-air talents Renee Young and Kayla Braxton, along with Adam Pearce and Jamie Noble, all recently tested positive for the coronavirus. Read more here.

JUNE 24

  • At least three people within WWE have tested positive for COVID-19, including in-ring talent, according to Ryan Satin of Pro Wrestling Sheet. Dave Meltzer of the Wrestling Observer adds that WWE has known about the test results for about a week. On the AEW side, President and CEO Tony Khan tweeted that world champion Jon Moxley (known as Dean Ambrose in WWE) was off Wednesday's "Dynamite" show after he was exposed to somebody with COVID-19. Read more here.

JUNE 17

JUNE 16

  • Professional wrestling and mixed martial arts journalist Dave Meltzer of the Wrestling Observer reported that WWE postponed its taping schedule for Tuesday after a developmental performer tested positive for the coronavirus. Previously, the Observer noted that WWE executive Paul Levesque, known as "Triple H," declined to directly answer if the promotion repeatedly tested performers and other personnel for the coronavirus. Read more here.


 
10 of 18

UFC

UFC
Henry Cejudo (red gloves) fights Dominick Cruz (blue gloves) during UFC 249. Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports

AUGUST 5

  • UFC head honcho told TMZ Sports that UFC will return to Fight Island in September or October. Read more here.

JULY 28

  • UFC boss Dana White announced during a Tuesday morning CNN appearance that the unbeaten Khabib Nurmagomedov will battle Justin Gaethje on Oct. 24. White didn't disclose a venue or location for the main-event bout. Read more here.

JULY 7

  • When Jorge Masvidal faces welterweight champion Kamaru Usman in the headliner of Saturday's UFC 251 show held at the Fight Island location on Yas Island in Abu Dhabi, the challenger will be without a longtime coach. As Danny Segura of MMA Junkie wrote, Brazilian outlet Combate reported on Tuesday that Mike Brown won't be in Masvidal's corner on Saturday after the American Top Team coach and former WEC world champion tested positive for the coronavirus. Read more here.

JULY 6

  • While speaking with ESPN's Brett Okamoto, Gilbert Burns confirmed that a positive coronavirus diagnosis forced him out of Saturday's UFC 251 main event versus welterweight champion Kamaru Usman. Burns explained that he flew from Florida to Las Vegas last Thursday, where he returned a positive result. Read more here.

JULY 3

  • Khabib Nurmagomedov's father, Abdulmanap, died from coronavirus complications, according to Russian outlet RT.com. He was 57. Abdulmanap died from brain injuries caused by a stroke after fighting the virus, RT.com says. Read more here.

JUNE 9

  • Dana White confirmed UFC's first bout on Fight Island — Yas Island in Abu Dhabi — will take place on July 11. UFC 251 will be Kamaru Usman vs. Gilbert Burns, Alexander Volkanovski vs.  Max Holloway, Petr Yan vs. Jose Aldo. Read more here.

JUNE 5

  • While speaking with TMZ ahead of Saturday's UFC 250 card headlined by featherweight champion Amanda Nunes defending her belt against Felicia Spencer, UFC boss Dana White explained Fight Island will be open for business on July 11. There will be an octagon outside on a beach, and the island features an arena and areas where fighters can train while maintaining social-distancing practices during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, according to White. Read more here.



 
11 of 18

Boxing

Boxing
The third installment of Canelo Alvarez vs. Gennady Golovkin will be postponed. Joe Camporeale-USA TODAY Sports

What's new in boxing:

JUNE 26

  • Boxing legend Roberto Durán has tested positive for the coronavirus after going to a hospital in Panama on Thursday with cold-like symptoms, he announced on Instagram. Read more here.

JUNE 18

  • The junior welterweight boxing match on Top Rank on ESPN between Jose Pedraza and Mikkel LesPierre has been canceled after Josie Taveras, LesPierre's manager, tested positive for COVID-19. In light of the cancellation, the junior lightweight fight between Gabe Flores Jr. and Josec Ruiz is now the main event. Read more here.

MAY 28

  • SI's Chris Mannix reported the third installment of Canelo Alvarez vs. Gennady Golovkin will be postponed. The fight was originally scheduled for Sept. 12 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, but the promoters did not want the bout to go on unless fans can attend. Canelo won the first fight, but the second bout came to a draw. Read more here.

MAY 27

  • The Associated Press reported Top Rank Boxing got the green light to return to Las Vegas, with the organization intending to hold multiple events on June 9 and 11 at the MGM Grand. Read more here.


 
12 of 18

Summer Olympics

Summer Olympics
The 2020 Summer Games were pushed to 2021. Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

The latest from the IOC:

JULY 21

  • The Kyodo news agency released a poll last week that showed just how little support the Olympics currently have in Japan, with only 23.9% of Japanese citizens polled supporting the Olympics being in Tokyo next summer. Meanwhile, 36.4% said they believed the Olympics need to be delayed again, and 34% said they would support the event being canceled altogether. Read more here.

JULY 11

  • Team USA basketball coach Gregg Popovich had some encouraging words about the Olympics taking place next summer. Per the Associated Press' Tim Reynolds, Pop cited Japan's successful response to the pandemic for why he's optimistic the Olympics can take place in Tokyo in 2021. Read more here.

JUNE 30

  • The International Olympic Committee says it will provide added support services to athletes worldwide through Athlete365, as an added layer to help them with the challenges that have arisen amid the coronavirus pandemic and the postponement of this year's games.

MAY 20

  • IOC president Thomas Bach said, “You cannot have the athletes being in uncertainty,” according to the BBC.

APRIL 28

  • Tokyo Games president Yoshiro Mori said these Olympics would be canceled entirely if they can’t take place on the new date. Read more here.

MARCH 29

  • The 2020 Summer Games were set to take place in Tokyo July 24 through Aug. 9 but now are tentatively scheduled for July 23 through Aug. 8, 2021. The sad truth is that no one knows what the world will look like a year from now and whether the games can take place then either. Read more here.
 
13 of 18

MLS, NWSL

MLS, NWSL
MLS and NWSL continue to be on hold. Rob Gray-USA TODAY Sports

MLS and NWSL most recent developments:

AUGUST 8

  • Major League Soccer revealed its plan to resume the regular season in home markets on Saturday, according to ESPN's Jeff Carlisle, with games beginning on Aug. 12. MLS also announced its playoff format with 18 teams qualifying for the postseason. The MLS Cup final will take place on Dec. 12. Read more here.

AUGUST 6

  • FC Dallas and Nashville SC, the two clubs that missed the MLS is Back tournament after suffering coronavirus outbreaks within their squads, will begin the resumption of the Major League Soccer regular season later this month. Read more here.

JULY 23

  • Despite fears about rising coronavirus cases throughout the United States, Major League Soccer side Atlanta United reportedly intends to open Mercedes-Benz Stadium to fans at a reduced capacity for games later this year. Read more here.

JULY 17

  • Months after the worsening coronavirus pandemic forced Major League Soccer to suspend the 2020 season after two matchdays, league commissioner Don Garber confirmed three expansion clubs will have debuts postponed at least a year. In an official statement, MLS said that Charlotte, Sacramento Republic FC and St. Louis have all been pushed back one year. Charlotte will debut in 2022, while Sacramento and St. Louis will begin MLS tenures in 2023. Read more here.
 
14 of 18

International soccer

International soccer
Some soccer leagues overseas have resumed play, albeit in empty stadiums. Ulrich Hufnagel/Xinhua/Sipa USA

Most recent news from international soccer circles:

AUGUST 10

  • Atletico Madrid  confirmed on Monday that members of the club's traveling party tested negative for the coronavirus and will fly to Portugal on Tuesday for Thursday's Champions League quarterfinal showdown versus Bundesliga outfit RB Leipzig. Angel Correa and Sime Vrsaljko both tested positive over the weekend. The two players are asymptomatic and self-isolating. Read more here.

AUGUST 3

  • The Italian Serie A will begin the 2020-21 campaign on Sept. 19, one week later that originally scheduled and a week after the English Premier League intends to start its season. The league also says it has shortened the annual Christmas break and scheduled fixtures for Jan. 3 and Jan. 6. It's unknown if fans will be able to attend. Read more here.

JULY 24

  • The 2020-21 EPL season will begin on Sept. 12, the league announced. The current season will end on July 26, and teams who aren't competing in European competition will have nearly two months to prepare for the campaign. Read more here.

JULY 20

  • According to ESPN, the Ballon d'Or has been canceled for the first time in the award's history due to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the soccer calendar. Group L'Equipe, the organizers of the award, announced that the conditions for the prize to be awarded had not taken place due to the pandemic. Read more here.

JULY 15

  • The International Football Association Board will allow leagues to expand the rule permitting clubs five substitutions per game instead of the standard three replacements through the end of upcoming 2020-21 campaigns. Read more here.

JULY 10

  • According to ESPN, soccer in the Netherlands will resume on Sept. 15 with 15 percent to 35 percent of stadiums available for spectators. No away supporters will be allowed, however. Spectators will need to remain about five feet apart, bring masks and buy drinks from roaming sellers rather than waiting in line at kiosks. Read more here.

JULY 1

  • Wigan became the first professional English side to enter into administration amid the coronavirus pandemic. Lack of funding from the side's new owners as well a financial burden placed on clubs since the pandemic started played a part, per BBC, which notes that other clubs might be in the same position soon. Read more here.
 
15 of 18

WNBA

WNBA
WNBA commissioner Cathy Engelbert Brad Mills-USA TODAY Sports

WNBA's latest developments:

JULY 14

  • The WNBA has denied Elena Delle Donne's request to opt out of the upcoming season for medical reasons, forcing her to decide if she will play or skip the season and not receive her salary. Delle Donne requested to skip the season because she has Lyme disease, which her personal physician told her puts her at risk of contracting COVID-19. However, Lyme disease is not listed by the CDC as an underlying condition that increases your odds of catching the coronavirus, and an independent panel determined she was not at-risk more than anyone else. Read more here.

JULY 13

  • The WNBA  unveiled its 2020 schedule and announced that the Seattle Storm, led by 2018 MVP Breanna Stewart, will battle first overall draft selection Sabrina Ionescu and the New York Liberty on July 25 to begin the season. The Phoenix Mercury face the Los Angeles Sparks, and the Washington Mystics begin their title defense versus the Indiana Fever later that same day. Read more here.

JUNE 15

  • The WNBA will resume play next month in Florida with a 22-game season and a full playoff schedule at IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla., the league announced Monday. Players who opt into the 2020 season will receive their full salaries, assuming the league is able to complete both the regular and postseason. Read more here.

APRIL 3

  • The WNBA announced it would be postponing training camp and the 2020 season, which was supposed to begin on May 15. The WNBA draft occurred on schedule on April 17, and Sabrina Ionescu was selected with the No. 1 overall pick by the New York Liberty. The WNBA paid tribute to Gianna Bryant, Payton Chester and Alyssa Altobelli, naming them honorary draft picks.
 
16 of 18

International baseball

International baseball
While MLB remains on hold, baseball has resumed overseas. Douglas DeFelice-USA TODAY Sports

What has happened in international baseball:

JULY 8

  • During a recent game against the Rakuten Eagles, the Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks employed 20 dancing robots to liven things up. The two kinds of robots, SoftBank’s humanoid robot ‘Pepper’ and others on four legs, engaged in a choreographed dance to the team’s fight song. Read more here.

JULY 1

  • The Mexican Baseball League has made the difficult decision to cancel the 2020 season, according to the Associated Press (h/t ESPN). The league's clubs earn the majority of their revenues from gate sales and in-person purchases. Sporting events throughout Mexico currently can only occur behind closed doors and without spectators. The season was scheduled to start Aug. 7. Read more here.

JUNE 30

  • Jeeho Yoo of Yonhap News reports that KBO fans could be in the seats within days. The plan is to open at approximately 30 percent capacity, with careful precautions in place to limit the potential for coronavirus transmission. Read more here.

JUNE 28

  • While the U.S. is experiencing a massive uptick in COVID-19 cases, the same can't be said for South Korea. As such, the Korea Baseball Organization is preparing guidelines to gradually admit fans back into parks, according to Jeeho Yoo of Yonhap News. There will be social distancing rules and other safety rules in place. Read more here.

JUNE 3

  • Jason Coskrey of the Japan Times revealed two players on the Yomiuri Giants have tested positive for COVID-19. Japan’s Nippon Professional Baseball resumed exhibition play this week as it prepares for its new June 19 start date. Read more here.

MAY 27

  • Although Japanese fans can't attend games, the league has found a way to help them connect with their teams. Jack Tarrant of Reuters reported Nippon is developing an app called the Remote Cheerer, which will let fans root for their teams. Tarrant explains fans' reactions will "reverberate around the stadium in real time, transmitted by giant loudspeakers." It's a creative approach that will also let players know their fans are thinking of them. Read more here.

MAY 25

  • Another overseas league will start soon, as Nippon Professional Baseball in Japan has set June 19 as its Opening Day. The league was supposed to start in March. Read more here.


 
17 of 18

eSports

eSports
eSports has thrived under lockdown during the pandemic. The Commercial Appeal-Imagn Content Services, LLC

esports carries on:


MAY 19

  • Esports’ popularity has experienced an uptick on both sides of the remote, as CNBC’s Bob Woods reported on May 19 that streaming website Twitch experienced a “23% surge in viewership in March,” coinciding with the time frame when much of the country started to stay home.

MAY 4

  • While the pandemic is having a negative effect on the sports world, it’s been business as usual for esports and gaming. Participants can easily play while maintaining social distancing guidelines since gaming takes place online. In fact, esports has been flourishing. Texas A&M head esports coach Travis Yang told KSAT.com that there has been a “noticeable increase” in gamers and tournaments as people were forced to stay at home.
 
18 of 18

One-off events

One-off events
The Boston Marathon was canceled for the first time in 124 years. Paul Rutherford-USA TODAY Sports

Most recent developments among other sports:

AUGUST 4

  • Indianapolis Motor Speedway has once again reversed course and declared that the Indianapolis 500 held on Aug. 23 will occur without fans in the stands due to the worsening coronavirus pandemic. Read more here.

JULY 1

  • The 2020 Mexico City Marathon announced that the race scheduled for Aug. 30 is canceled. According to Mexico News Daily, the event drew roughly 30,000 runners last year. Read more here.

JUNE 26

  • The Indianapolis 500, set for Aug. 23, became the latest American sporting event to welcome fans amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Indianapolis Motor Speedway President J. Douglas Boles confirmed the news, stating, "We will be limiting attendance to approximately 50 percent of venue capacity." Per Shanna McCarriston of CBS Sports, Indianapolis Motor Speedway carries a capacity of around 235,000. The official announcement also explained that individuals who do not wish to attend, such as those considered high-risk, will receive credits. Safety items such as masks and hand sanitizer will be distributed to all race attendees. Read more here.

JUNE 24

  • The world's largest marathon in New York City has officially been canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to Jackie Salo of the New York Post. The five-borough race, which hosts more than 50,000 runners from across the globe, would've celebrated its 50th anniversary on Nov. 1. It is now set to take place on Nov. 7, 2021. Read more here.

JUNE 23

  • The Haspa Marathon Hamburg, which was postponed from April, is set to occur on Sept. 13. The race is expecting 10,000 to 14,000 runners. However, Americans might not be among thm. Action Network's Darren Rovell reported that runners from "higher-risk COVID areas" will not be allowed to participate. A higher-risk area could include the United States. Read more here.

JUNE 13

  • Approximately 20,000 rugby fans in New Zealand packed the stands to watch the Otago Highlanders take on the Waikato Chiefs in the Super Rugby Aotearoa competition. New Zealand lifted nearly all of its coronavirus restrictions earlier in the week, as no new cases have been reported for more than 20 days and the death toll is at just 22 in the country since the pandemic started. Read more here.

MAY 28

  • The Boston Marathon, originally scheduled for April 20 but postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic, was canceled and converted into a virtual experience. It's the first time in 124 years the Marathon won't run. Read more here.


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